UNESCO HIV and AIDS Education Clearinghouse forum

18-29 May 2009. Teachers and HIV & AIDS: reviewing achievements, identifying challenges. (Closed forum) => Teachers and HIV prevention => Topic started by: Forum Moderator on May 06, 2009, 01:59:11 pm



Title: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 06, 2009, 01:59:11 pm
• What mechanisms are in place in your country or the country/ies in which you work to support teachers to address HIV and AIDS? Consider, for example, the relative importance of: curriculum and associated instructional aids, support from teachers’ unions, school management and administration, links with parents and communities, quality assurance and support systems, and the establishment of a safe and secure institutional environment.
 
• Is there an education sector policy in your country or the country/ies in which you work and how does it address issues such as teacher training, professional conduct, supervision, and the workplace? Were professional bodies representing teachers involved in its development and review? How are the outcomes monitored?

• In your opinion, how does the process by which teachers are selected to teach about HIV affect their motivation to take on this task? In what way(s) do you think the teacher selection process impacts on the outcomes of their work? What recommendations might you make to improve the process?

• What are the incentives and the disincentives for teachers in becoming involved in HIV education? Is compensation, financial or otherwise, provided and is this seen to be fair?

• What additional managerial capacity needs to be built, or what existing capacity needs to be strengthened, to respond to HIV effectively?


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Barbara on May 18, 2009, 12:07:14 pm
Dear forum participants,

It is my pleasure to open this forum. I hope you will be able to log on easily and to share your contributions with us.

One point on which I would be interested in obtaining your views is that of extra incentives for teachers teaching on HIV prevention. At a recent workshop in Ghana on Educational planning and management, we learnt from participants that some teachers in both Ghana and Nigeria are asking for extra remuneration to teach on HIV although it is part of their in-service training. Is this happening in your countries as well? Why do you think this happening in Ghana and Nigeria?

Barbara
IIEP-UNESCO


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: G_Dart on May 18, 2009, 04:08:44 pm
I suppose we would have to know what the expectations are for the teachers - is it an 'extra' duty outside and beyond their normal teaching load? If so then perhaps they are viewing it as a post of responsibility which should be rewarded.
Or are they thinking that the cultural 'cost' of integrating the topic into their everyday teaching to them is quite high (in the sense that they are being asked to confront and talk about issues - sexuality / relationships / medical care etc - that has not been the remit of teachers traditionally and takes some courage to talk about)?


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Liesl Harewood on May 18, 2009, 04:39:33 pm
 I am speaking for the experience in Barbados.

·         What mechanisms are in place in your country or the country/ies in which you work to support teachers to address HIV and AIDS? Consider, for example, the relative importance of: curriculum and associated instructional aids, support from teachers’ unions, school management and administration, links with parents and communities, quality assurance and support systems, and the establishment of a safe and secure institutional environment.

In many cases,HIV and AIDS-related themes have been included in the curriculum, especially in the arts, with suppoprt from school management.

 

·         Is there an education sector policy in your country or the country/ies in which you work and how does it address issues such as teacher training, professional conduct, supervision, and the workplace? Were professional bodies representing teachers involved in its development and review? How are the outcomes monitored?

·         In your opinion, how does the process by which teachers are selected to teach about HIV affect their motivation to take on this task? In what way(s) do you think the teacher selection process impacts on the outcomes of their work? What recommendations might you make to improve the process?

In my experience, teachers have been asked to volunteer.  Those who volunteer would probably have been intrinsically motivated but usually, this is seen as an addition to an already heavy workload.

 

·         What are the incentives and the disincentives for teachers in becoming involved in HIV education? Is compensation, financial or otherwise, provided and is this seen to be fair?

As far as I know, there is no compensation provided.  This could be one of the disincentives.  I also think that although teachers care about their students' welfare and may make general comments or address HIV in certain parts of the syllabus, they (we) feel that government can deploy people who are specifically trained in this area (health care professionals) to spearhead HIV education in schools.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 19, 2009, 10:36:10 am

I will like to participate in this topic because it is a very striking issue in My country. Much is being done in Cameroon for the sensitization of the public but in the domain of schools especially in the primary education, there is not enough being done. The curriculum provides no place for HIV/Aids education. HIV/AIDS is just a topic in the Health and environmental education. For this reason, very little importance is accorded to the formation of teachers to give effective training to the children. Presently also no text book or manual exist in the primary schools for HIV/AIDS.
School administrators and parents and the communities especially in the rural areas has no clear link at all since the truth is that they are less aware of the Issue of HIV/AIDS.
It was not until April 2009 when a training workshop for teachers was organised in Yaounde but this was not involving a visual number of teachers in the rural areas.
This i think will not really help the HIV/AIDS problem in our schools because few will be privileged than others.
I think the selection process to train teachers should be carried out selecting teachers from both the urban and rural areas and the training should take place in the local areas.
If Special teachers were recruited and trained specially for HIV/AIDS education and well motivated,  like how mathematics and English teachers are recruited, it will be of  great help.
What is needed to be done is to make HIV/AIDS as a subject to schools, text books and manuals for HIV/AIDS like the aids free generation book and others be introduced.
But foe this to happen, i think the Governments has to be supported financially and technically.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Mark_Omolade on May 19, 2009, 10:43:37 am
In Nigeria,l did a study on HIV/AIDS in a school among classroom teachers and effort to educate their pupils on prevention and the result revealed that there were more males that wanted the prevention to be compulsory in their school curriculum than females. With this type of a case,I'll suggest the school should make prevention of HIV/AIDS to be a compulsory subject in the curriculum. Mark


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: M_Juma on May 19, 2009, 12:54:28 pm
There is a need of empowering teachers to be able to enhance with students on HIV prevention. Up to this day there is not clear training to teachers on HIV prevention skills.

The policy should be implemented effectively.

Mgesi
+255 717 538853


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: TSHEKO, G.N. (DR.) on May 19, 2009, 01:22:10 pm
In Botswana, the teaching of HIV and AIDS has been integrated into some of the subjects taught in primary and secondary schools such as science, moral education and Guidance and counseling. HIV and AIDS is also supposed to be infused into other subjects. This however teachers find the most difficult to do. Currently the Ministry of Education and Skills Development is working through its Curriculum Development department to train teachers on using material that is meant for acquirement of lifeskills including HIV and AIDS topics. This in a way should assist teachers to gain confidence in teaching about HIV prevention in all subjects.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Okonkwo Chijioke Obinna on May 19, 2009, 01:44:26 pm
I Okonkwo Chijioke Obinna (Nigeria), from my own knowledge about this issue in Nigeria, the National Youth Service Corp(NYSC) scheme has posed a great challange to training of teachers on this subject matter. This is why government will always see teaching especially as work done by paupers. Teaching is a proffession likewise politics. One cannot seat in a country where politicians throw about money and you expect him to do free work;more work more pay or people to handle the project specifically be trained.  Teachers in Nigeria are poorly motivated exept for those of them in the Private schools. For many years now, public schools in Nigeria are moribund ,that is why you can see more females than males in most Public schools reason is because males feel that what they earn cannot pay their bills. This should be made curricurum based and not be used as an extra work for teachers who has being suffering for years now.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 19, 2009, 02:56:20 pm
Below is the translation of contribution orginally received in French from Oulaye Lydet from Côte d'Ivoire.

Given the difficulties medicine is facing in finding a cure for AIDS, prevention has become important. Emphasis is therefore placed on behavior change, as STDs are linked to an individual’s behavior. In the cases of pupils, the Education Ministry evokes sexual precocity, multiple sexual partners and the lack of condom use. The Ministry supposes that it is a question of information. In order to avoid STDs/AIDs and pregnancy amongst pupils, it has consequently decided, through the school curriculum, to inform them. Particularly at secondary level, which my research relates to, Civic and Moral Education is the subject through which, since 1983, the Ministry has initiated information in the area of sexuality. It was therefore via Civic and Moral Education that HIV and AIDS curricular were integrated from the mid 1990’s.

However, such efforts cannot hide the fact that the information which pupils may receive at school does not necessarily have an impact on the interactions and interrelations that pupils have with the social environment. Yet they also live their sexuality through these relations. To take the example of the family, in certain families there is a lack of communication between parents and their children on questions related to sexuality, it is not certain that parents relay the information their children receive in school.

In addition, since the beginning of the 1990’s society and school have been disrupted by social, economic and political problems, including the armed conflict in 2002. School is perturbed permanently by union demonstrations by the Fédération Estudiantine et Scolaire de Cote d’Ivoire, and more irregularly but perturbing nonetheless, by different teachers unions protesting about their living and working conditions. These difficulties which the school institution in general, and secondary education in particular, live through, are further obstacles to the vulgarization and transmission of information on STDs and HIV/AIDs in the school environment.

Therefore if school can contribute to information on STDs and HIV/AIDS, it must be emphasized that the results of these efforts also depend on the cultural, social, economic, political or institutional context within which they are deployed. Therefore when one of the fundamental aspects of the promotion of information in school, teacher training, is experiencing difficulties, the objectives of the transmission of knowledge are called into question.

Questions regarding the training of teachers in Civic and Moral Education and other related issues (the objectives of the school programme, the pedagogical methods used, didactical tools, results obtained, evaluation of results, regulation) have always constituted an enormous problem. The training of teachers in Civic and Moral Education is incomplete. Teaching is undertaken by secondary level teachers who initially were trained in other subjects (English, French, Earth and Life Sciences). Very few of them benefit from the irregular “training seminars” or “reconversion” organized by the Civic and Moral Education section of the Department of Education and Production of Learning Materials (Direction de la Pédagogie et de la Production des Matériels Didactiques). Civic and Moral Education is the “poor relation” of the direction, it lacks resources to undertake properly its activities, including the “training seminars” which support initial training. Teachers are therefore left to their own devices for pedagogical and didactical questions. They “manage” as best they can. If, in these circumstances, the objective of the transmission of knowledge to pupils, is more or less attained, the essential question remains as to whether behavior change with a view to reducing the number of pregnancies and STDs/AIDs in the school environment is occurring. No evaluation of this kind has been undertaken and it is not possible to provide a satisfactory response to this preoccupation.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 19, 2009, 06:23:27 pm

I will like to participate in this topic because it is a very striking issue in My country. Much is being done in Cameroon for the sensitization of the public but in the domain of schools especially in the primary education, there is not enough being done. The curriculum provides no place for HIV/Aids education. HIV/AIDS is just a topic in the Health and environmental education. For this reason, very little importance is accorded to the formation of teachers to give effective training to the children. Presently also no text book or manual exist in the primary schools for HIV/AIDS.
School administrators and parents and the communities especially in the rural areas has no clear link at all since the truth is that they are less aware of the Issue of HIV/AIDS.
It was not until April 2009 when a training workshop for teachers was organised in Yaounde but this was not involving a visual number of teachers in the rural areas.
This i think will not really help the HIV/AIDS problem in our schools because few will be privileged than others.
I think the selection process to train teachers should be carried out selecting teachers from both the urban and rural areas and the training should take place in the local areas.
If Special teachers were recruited and trained specially for HIV/AIDS education and well motivated,  like how mathematics and English teachers are recruited, it will be of  great help.
What is needed to be done is to make HIV/AIDS as a subject to schools, text books and manuals for HIV/AIDS like the aids free generation book and others be introduced.
But foe this to happen, i think the Governments has to be supported financially and technically.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 19, 2009, 06:25:05 pm
In Kenya, there is an education sector policy. The policy is very clear on what all learning institutions should do. For example, all TTC are supposed to use the policy to come up with their own institutional HIV/AIDS policy. Not all colleges have these policies in place and that means they have not conceptualized HIV/AIDS. This leaves them at the mercy of NGO's who conducts ad hoc training on various aspects of HIV/AIDS education. This lack of systematic implementation of the education sector policy means tutors as well as trainee teachers are not well prepared to handle HIV/AIDS in their classes. The monitoring and evaluation department at the ministry needs to follow up on how the policy is being implemented. There are only 19 government TTC's. This follow up will wake up principals and deans of curriculum who have all been trained on HIV/AIDS! Since 2000 when the policy was launched, what are these people waiting for while new preventable HIV infections takes place because of ignorance.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Inalegwu Frank Uji on May 19, 2009, 07:13:33 pm
I am happy to be part of this discussion as am from one of the communities in Benue state Nigeria with high number of persons living with HIV/AIDS.

In Nigeria there are set of educational program for teachers in HIV/AIDS education.

The Federal ministry of health and UNESCO in 2002 organised a training and call for draft for HIV/AIDS curriculum in Nigeria and Inon schenker came from the UNESCO office i was part of the 1st draft. This is because of the spread of HIV/AIDS then and the Government felt there is need to call for Family Life Education in all the secondary schools and primary.

This call was to help the teachers build their skills as they are the ones closer to the students and develop them in learning about reproductive health and HIV.

Since then, they has been documents developed on Family life Education for secondary schools and most of the ministry of education have HIV/AIDS Units especially in Benue state, Nigeria.

Here, it is teacherss to students and parents as we have Parent Teachers Associations and teachers can help in spreading the HIV/AIDS education.

This days when we make HIV/AIDS as a health problem and money making, we will fail but if we can have the basic skills in HIV/AIDS education we can do better in helping to contribute to the prevention program.

We all have been affected directly and indirectly but if we fail to note its our responsibilities to help others, then we cant find the better cure.

The Country HIV/AIDS work policy is there but we see teachers discriminating against others living with HIV/AIDS. We should pay teachers to teach HIV/AIDS education? well thats okay but lets see how well teachers themselves taking time to even find out what is HIV/AIDS talk less of teaching but just want to be paid.

So every teacher would want to teach HIV/AIDS education. But should go and have a certificate in HIV/AIDS education and prevention even thos that have been trained because there were givien stippends durring the training, come back and wait for them to be paid and not care of stepping forward for others (not stepping down). It will be better for the teachers liviving with HIV/AIDS teach than those that are not showing their status.

As we all know, HIV/AIDS is not what we see it this days but where we all have to be to make us contribute to the prevention.
Do we the teachers care in carrying out HIV/AIDS research in our communities,schools or wait for others to come to our communities and do for us.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: O_Olukoya on May 20, 2009, 01:20:02 am
I really appreciate the organizers of this timely forum and the contribution of others. In Nigeria, Teachers and HIV prevention is an issue that needed sincere attention by the concerned authorities. For instance in Lagos Nigeria, the secondary schools have been divided into six districts and the schools  are all under the Lagos State Ministry of Education but the motivation and participation of primary and secondary school teachers in the prevention of HIV in Lagos and Nigeria have been very low before now. Kudos to the NGOs and the state ministries of health who have been collaborating with the state ministries of Education and NGOs in Nigerian schools to bring the message to the grassroots.

Having said that, it is what you have you can give. You can not give what you don’t have. Most of the teachers in our part of world don’t have basic knowledge of HIV education. Some don’t even want to talk about it at all, talkless of discussing the issue.

For instance in 2004 in Lagos, The issue of HIV prevention became necessary in primary schools in Lagos, the commercial capital of Nigeria, the most populous black nation around the world with population of over 140 million people, because of the alarming rate in the spread of the infection and because of this, the Nigeria Union of Teachers, Lagos State Wing, organized an awareness programme on the prevention of HIV among primary school pupils in Lagos, Nigeria.

The Nigeria Union of Teachers, Lagos State Wing, is charged with the responsibility of carrying out an IMPACT project on the prevention of HIV. Forty three advocacies were made and followed by the training of forty teachers as HIV coordinators in the forty primary schools in Ojo Local Government Education Authority. Four hundred pupils were also trained by these HIV coordinators as Peer Educators. They, in turn, were able to reach out to their peers through the Anti-AIDS club activities where they educate them on HIV prevention messages.

 The programme enabled participants’ free discussion on the issue of HIV and other health related issue among the peers. From their conversation, they tend to enlighten one another and now care for a healthy future which at the end of the day led to behavoiur change.

There have not been such programmes again since 2004. The authorities concerned are not doing enough. There are awareness programmes on daily bases from NGOs I just want to implore the concerned education managers to wake up.


Sesan Olukoya,
African Youth Empowerment-Nigeria.
Lagos
ayen_nigeria@yahoo.com


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Regina Lialabi Handongwe on May 20, 2009, 01:59:10 pm
In Zambia there are so many programmes being implemented in schools focusing on HIV teachers and HIV prevention. There is need for all stakeholders and the government to conduct evidence based research on the impact that these programmes have especially on behaviour and attitude.

Regina


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 20, 2009, 02:52:56 pm
A contribution sent via email from Francelino Da Silva Correia, President of TLETA (The Timor Leste Exact Teacher Association):

1.   in my country workshop, from Department of health, Promotion, via Television, radio, blood checking, urine checking. No other mechanism.
-   Our curriculum in our country specific for HIV and AIDS not yet establish, but the topics about HIV and AIDS students learn only in material of Biology.
-   After our country has freedoms not yet supporting fro much organization to the teacher how to learn or study cases specific about the HIV and AIDS.
-   Not yet establish support from teacher unions, luck of the equipments to study about HIV and AIDS.
-   School management and administration 20% only from department of education, but not to study about HIV and AIDS epidemic.
-   Links parents and community my be 15%  some times no sustainable
-   No quality assurance and support system, why I say like this, because some time yes 5,or 6 month  finish and lost again, my be one year start again no sustainable
-   No and nothing establishment of a safe and secure institutional of environment. 
2.   In my country at Department of Education they have policy about teachers training (specific for Natural science teacher and language training, Social and cultural training for teacher in specialized Social science.
-   In this cases not yet establish permanent training for specific HIV and AIDS teacher training. Because no equipments, material specific laboratories, Experts for service training by teacher in HIV and AIDS.
-   No professional conduct
-   15% for supervision
-   have workplace
-   No structure bodies to represent specific teacher involving in development and review.
-   The outcome monitor by each bodies in the Department of Education only.
3.   In my opinion (as a TLETA President), all teacher graduated in biology Department of Education and the selected must be involved Association of Natural science teachers. Or selected by Association (TLETA) not Department of Education because not clear, my be KKN (not fair play, but Department of Education received report only  from Association as a partnership of National Development.
-   The good way(s) how to selected the teacher via Association and then approved by the Department of Education, it is good selection process impact on the outcomes of their work.
-   The recommendation is the Associated must write official report to the Department of Education and The Department of Health, discussion together about the outcomes of forum. (teachers and HIV and AIDS reviewing Achievements Identifying  challenges, and you are as UNAIDS must support us to write recommendation or resolution tome (us) organization my Association and send directed to the both of the Department legally of Government in each country, to support us. Because I am a person as a participate at forum of 2009. Start 18 to 29 may 2009.   
4.   The incentives and the disincentives important for teacher to involved in HIV and AIDS Education are :
-   Transportation fee (Plan, Sea, and land, transportation.
-   Accommodation aid support
-   Perdue for teacher who spend their time to involved in HIV and AIDS training
-   Salaries
-   Recreation fees
-   Compensation, Financial or otherwise
5.   The additional managerial, leadership excellent, Skill of theory must be good, Organizational Classroom, Capacity of Organized Laboratories is good, must graduated in Biology or Medicine area including Agricultural department, and because they have capacity to set up Laboratories also be good.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion: Incentive for teacher
Post by: R_Chediel on May 20, 2009, 04:01:19 pm
It appears that there are countries where teachers are appointed to teach HIV and AIDS education. This is where the teachers can ask for incentives. In Tanzania HIV and AIDS is taught through carrier subjects, such as Biology and Civics. In this case the subject teachers cannot ask for insentives. HIV and AIDS issue is treated as cross-cutting. Therefore every teacher is supposed to teach. Unless the teaching goes further to actual care and support, then teachers involved here need incentives.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: J_Mmbando on May 20, 2009, 04:27:07 pm
In my opinion we need to focus to empower teachers especial for primar school which is big issue here in Tanzania as the goverment they intoducing the school book fr teachs but most of the sciency teachers they fear to talk with pupils about HIV as the shy to answer the critical question from the student this i was experiance during my voluunteer teaching in some schools.



Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Might Abreh on May 20, 2009, 06:52:05 pm
What does teachers want? what can other stakeholders do to support our teachers? They play a vital role therefore structuring the curriculum to cover initial interest on the subject of HIV AIDS is a step in the right direction to address the challenge.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 20, 2009, 09:13:16 pm
HIV/AIDS policies do results in action on the ground, in our institite for educational development operating in the three Eastern African countries, we have integrated HIV/AIDS education as stated in the policies. However, due to limited follow up, some of the institutions we work with like TTC's and schools are not implementing the policy. Effectiveness of implementation is difficult to judge when the expected outcome is not well stated and the indicators of success is also not clear. I think the AIDS control units at the ministries of education should come up with some indicators in consultation with stakeholders.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: lady_murrugarra on May 20, 2009, 09:56:56 pm
Dear forum participants,

It is my pleasure to open this forum. I hope you will be able to log on easily and to share your contributions with us.

In Peru we are working in the training and contents in the schools, universities, communities and using the ICT (distance learning) for LAC.

Lady


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Mark_Omolade on May 21, 2009, 11:13:13 am
Government should make a policy on Teachers and HIV/AIDS prevention to be a focal point to school Administrators in their curriculum,with this there would be  changes in pupils behaviour toward waywards life. Also,in the policy,drama theatre should be included to demonstrate the teaching of HIV/AIDS prevention.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: matthew nyarkoh on May 21, 2009, 05:48:07 pm
My problem has to do with how some expext in the HIV Prevention tend to compound the solutions by all trying to give different figures of people living with HIV and those ho have died to the disease.
I think it is time the UNAIDS come out with the correct figure that would be accepted worldwide.
This with other resourceful euipment and information in a way will teachers in the prevention of HIV


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 21, 2009, 09:22:21 pm
While conducting an In-service programme in Kenya last year, I had a session on HIV/AIDS education which was facilitated by a teacher living positively with HIV from Kenya Network of Positive Teachers (KENEPOTE). This association of teachers do provide support to teachers who need to deal with the social aspects of HIV pandemic in their classes or school. The facilitators provide a way of dealing with panic and fear that once you are infected with HIV you cannot live a normal life. I was particularly impressed with the way this group is visible and answer questions based on their life experiences. The facilitator was able to display the ARV's and when to take them and the type of diet and activities they engage in to stay healthy and fit to lead a normal life. I could not have done this hands-on activity. It was so real and I think the teachers enjoyed the session and made contact.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: PP_Gile on May 22, 2009, 06:57:51 am
Hi Forum Participants.

In Ethiopia, there are  good public policies of which education and training policy, HIV/AIDS Policy. The issue of teachers and HIV prevention strategies clearly stated in the national and sectoral strategic plans. As it might be common in some other countries, we are implementing the "Three One " approach as well as contextualized and fine tuned education and HIV/AIDS policies, strategies and governance systems in place(though implementation problems are norms..due to various reasons-such as specialy trained instructors, focal points, funding, lack of harmony and strategic partnership...in some institutions). The governement considers HIV/AIDS as a cross-cutting high development agenda and recognizes education as one of the best solutions and entry point for all interventions in HIV prevention and responding to the complicated impacts of the epidemic in Ethiopia. I know federal HIV/AIDS prevention and control authority/secretariate has a big institution spearheading HIV/AIDS interventions in schools(of all levels). Hence teachers participation is in place, HIV prevention na d other pillars of mainstreaming are included in the curriculum and infused into co-curricular activities in Ethiopia. Political commitment is there but due to a culture mosaic nature of a country, there are still problems associated with cultural and traditional norms, values, beliefs, perceptions, attitudes, mind set, silences...of considering HIV/AIDS issues as that of 'others', lack of openness among some categories of society(some times religious factors), poverty issues, gender inequalities, corruption....though the current massive transformation and reform efforts are attempting to reverse the problems solved(lack of inefficiencies and ineffectivenesses...observed..)


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 22, 2009, 10:25:25 am
Contribution received via email from Ethiopia:

HIV/AIDS Policy is teacher and student friendly, mainstreaming efforts are in place, currucular integration in place, focal points assigned, participation of teachers, students, some parents/family memebrs there(but need to be scaled up and benchmarked)...but there is a need for more capacity building efforts, more funding. However, interschool, intercollege, interuniversity partnership and collaboration is not there(if there is it is nominal and not active) hence network should be inplace..there are colleges and universities doing very good job in mainstreaming but these best practices not shared among each other..I call every body(concerned) to gather together and share best experiences--my institution might take the initiative for such gathering... for examople 21 or 30 universities and colleges of public sector could meet here and share where were we? where are we now? where do we wnat to be? what is there? what is missing? what more roles can we play? ...???


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 22, 2009, 10:35:11 am
The Education sector policy in my country :

1. Mybe lack of the sistem training in my country to handle the HIV AIDS
2. Lack of the strategic or method the Implementation in the Education Sector Policy.
3. in Our Country for Education Department not yet Prepare the specific Method of specific Policies to the trainning for trainer to involved teacher body and to Solving the HIV and AIDS.
4. My be in the Department of Health in my country already implemente or prepare this the management policies.to prevent the HIV Aids.
 
Best regards
 
Francelino da Silva correia


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 23, 2009, 02:11:56 am
In Kenya, the Kenya national union of teachers (KNUT) came up with the HIV/AIDS workplace policy and therein explained how HIV is transmitted and how one can protect themselves in a school context. There is the use of gloves during first aid or use of a polythene or any plastic bag if gloves are not available. The workplace policy has helped reduce discrimination in government schools. However, unconfirmed stories from private schools indicate that HIV positive teachers are layed off on filmsy grounds if they are discovered. This usually happens when they have do go for compulsory medical test for insurance cover provided by most private schools. I personnally had a test done where the form had only HIV ticked out among a range of possible tests that could be carried out for medical cover. But because of the silence about HIV/AIDS no one fights back. I had to take my chances and hope to test negative and keep earning money for my family. I could have fought back knowing the existence of the workplace policy and the education sector policy. But in this private school which is high cost, they do not even teach the integrated HIV in the curriculum since they follow IGCSE. So in some schools in Kenya, the private posh schools, nothing is being done on stigma and discrimination...after all HIV/AIDS is a poor mans dsisease...that only affects 'others' not us. There is fear of parents and school administration!


Title: Strategies put in place by teachers and stakeholders to address hiv-related sti
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 24, 2009, 03:03:51 pm
Dear moderator,
In response to the question for discussion on the saturday, onthe strategiesput in place by teachers  to address the HIV-related stigma and discrimination in schools.
I willlike to send this contribution
- Massive sensitisation campaignes are being carried out In cameroon but only few teachers and puplils are involved. For example the cameroon center  for the education and the protection of the child is carring out a door to toor sensitisation to parents and children on this issue.
- HIV/AIDS is being equivilated to Malaria , tuberclosis and even yellow fever so that those who are victims of HIV/AIDS will not be looked upon like having a deadly and special illness.
- Presently also in camerron, an assosiation DIAP mobile unit for Psychosocial support even though not a teachers assosiation is moving in rural areas started inBamenda Cameroon,giving Psychological support to victims and counseling non victims on the issue of stigmatisation.
- More HIV/AIDs patience are involved now and are encouraged to be involved in activism.
- Teachers and students are encouraged to denounce their HIV/AIDS status.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Francelino da Silva Correia on May 25, 2009, 09:27:52 am
Mr.Francelino da Silva (Timor Leste)

The strategies and method are being  implemented in my country is be good by teacher (other staiecholders) are :
1. we must establish center of research and physicological counseling center tewards HIV and AIDS at every school (senior High School and junior high school) and organized by teacher and head teacher.

2. We must establish center of Students cheking about HIV /AIDS organizes by teacher  and also Coorporate with the Ministry of health. RDTL, from the section on promotion of HIV /AIDS
Strategic of teaching it is meaning :
1.  the curiculum wemust be including matery or subject for HIV/AIDS (one lesson specific not to misturate to the Biology subject.
I say like this beacause in my Country the biology subject not separate with the program or Subject of the HIV/AIDS section. or materi at the lesson.

2.we must provide the teacher in specialy programme in HIV and AIDS to teach the students on theory and Practicing.

Francelino da Silva Correia


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Francelino da Silva Correia on May 25, 2009, 09:47:21 am
the additional managerial leadership  must Excelent, skills of theory must be good, Organizational Classroom, capacity of Organized the laboratories is good, must graduated in biology or medical area including also graduated from the Agricultural Laboratories area..

In my opinions:
The incentives and the desicentives important for teacher to involved in HIV/AIDS education are :
1.Transportation Fee (Plan, sea, and land transportation)
2. Accomodation aid Support
3. Perdue for teacher who spend their time to involved in HIV and AIDS training.
4. salaries
5. Recreation fees
6. other compensation, Financial or otherwise.
Why I say that, because many teacher living at the villages and some times no transportation to quickly to do something at their jobs to prevent the HIV and AIDS but they meet the many difucuty problems. at transportation area this experiences in my Country. thank you. 


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 25, 2009, 02:35:30 pm
Thanks Silva,
That was a very good suggestion. I can see that our countries are almost operating in the same manner. I will also want to suggest that these recommendations UNESCO should send them to our governments.
But what do you think about recruiting and training Psychologist and send to schools rather than the teachers and head teachers?   


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 25, 2009, 02:45:17 pm
Different cultures and tradition especially in Africa and Cameroon in particular view HIV/AIDS in different ways, so in designing a curriculum for HIV/AIDS, we have to take into consideration the culture and tradition.
What do you think about this?


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 25, 2009, 09:49:02 pm
As a biology teacher in secondary school in Kenya I taught HIV education as it was part of STIs sub-topic. The content was mainly biomedical hence I feel others should teach the other aspects as well. The head teacher can teach the policy aspects that deals with stigma and discrimination and thus provide leadership by making the school a safe place inclusive. The healthcare workers can help with care and support for those infected and affected as they need medication and assistance. Since the HIV/AIDS issue is more complex, the school cannot have all the expertise required hence there is even need to include other stakeholders who can provide referral services like guidance and counselling and part-time and vocational skills for those who need to support family members.
On the issue of traditions, norms and culture, I feel the Kenya curriculum developers are trying to please everyone hence they have always circumvented these issue by coming up with programmes that avoid mentioning sexuality. Previously we were at it with ABC where the C was suppose to mean better communication and not condom as is the case. Right now a new life skills programme has been launched in primary schools with a belief that if one is taught life skills s/he will be able to survive. Being assertive and a good communicator is good but I feel they are not enough. Lifeskills has not been proven to work in isolation, it is not 'the magic bullet'. We are going through a denial phase whereby the curriculum developers are playing diplomacy while giving half cake as far as HIV/AIDS education is concerned. This kind of scenario is what fuels new HIV infection.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 26, 2009, 10:26:49 am
A contribution received via email from Dr. T. Adepoju in Nigeria:

On Teaching HIV Education in Schools
 
Because of the nature of the epidemic, health care experts and professionals are best suited to teach HIV educations in schools but due to insufficient numbers of health care professionals in most of the developing countries, teachers and headteachers could be given series of trainings to be able to handle the teaching of HIV education in schools. Of course, teachers and headteachers will be very relevant in schools because schools is their workplace. When teachers and headteachers receive the needed trainings, they will be sufficiently equiped. For instance, a course/ workshop on educational planning and management in a World with AIDS organised by IIEP- BREDA between 20-24 April, 2009 in Accra, Ghana where I was a participant have university teachers and trainers from six African countries and the training received equipped us to teach HIV and AIDS related subjects in our institutions of learning. This is to say in essence that, teachers and headteachers can be trained to handle the teaching of HIV education in schools.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 26, 2009, 10:28:46 am
A contribution received via email from Dr. T. Adepoju in Nigeria:

On Curricullum Design 
 
For HIV and AIDS to be appropriately incorporated into the curriculum, there is no doubt that the culture and traditional norms should be taken into consideration. In Nigeria, the practice is that every culture and tradition of the people are considered in the process of designing HIV and AIDS curriculum.HIV and AIDs related subjects are teaching in local languages while the HIV and AIDS National Policy Technical Working Committee was made up of representatives of local, state and federal government agencies.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 26, 2009, 12:38:46 pm
A contribution received via email from Jean Pierre Delmas in the Central African Republic:

The mechanisms in place to assist teachers in the fight against HIV / AIDS in Central African Republic: the established processes of training for reproductive health, education etc ... whose teachers assigned adhered to these ideals, that they can experience the same atmosphere of people not affected by AIDS, to teach their students how to protect themselves to eradicate this scourge .For this, they are in the same company .
 
Central African Republic, we have implemented a policy to enable us to better work in this sector.
- As we are an NGO, trainers and volunteers as a lead Sociologist first biographical approach to target and locate areas of training and after training and awareness to take place, they will pass on the survey for improve the work.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 26, 2009, 12:55:19 pm
I see with you on your point of view for teachers and head teachers to be trained for HIV/AIDS education in schools because it is their work place. The type of workshop organised by IIEP- BREDA between 20-24 April, 2009 in Accra, Ghana should be encouraged in all countries and be done in a systematic way. Yes i think your idea was a good one.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 27, 2009, 12:17:53 am
I totally support the idea of UNESCO and UNAIDS assisting with teacher training and helping schools in developing institional policies. This is in line with the Kenya Education Sector HIV/AIDS policy that requires each learning institution to develop their own policy using the education sector policy as a framework. The policy also encourages learning institutions to seek partnership with stakeholders dealing with HIV/AIDS issues: hence enganging with UNESCO & UNAIDS will be welcomed. So far most institutions lack the capacity to fund training for teachers and most have not even seen the education sector policy since it was launched in 2004. I personaly benefited from a training offered by Inwent and the The University of Western Cape, South Africa, the course was fully sponsored for teacher educators and since then I have facilitated many in-service programmes apart from designing and integrating HIV preventive education in our Institute for Educational Development, Eastern Africa. I feel most teachers need a proper training, teaching materials/resources and support from the school administration to deliver the 'education vaccine' to the learners. By having an institutional policy developed by the school's stakeholders, there will be a condusive atmosphere where silence towards HIV/AIDS can be broken.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Francelino da Silva Correia on May 27, 2009, 02:43:44 am
Answer Quetion discusion yesterday

Accordings my Idea or Exeriences during involved in schools, as Teacher in Biology, so the best of Suited to teach about HIV and AIDS is Teacher and health care only Only


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Francelino da Silva Correia on May 27, 2009, 03:00:21 am
Answer Questions yesterday:

The role of jointly between UNAIDS Team on HIV /AIDS and supporting teachers at the countri level are.

My idea.
The first is How to support the Financial otherwise for teachers training.
The second is to support Especially  Expert from the HIV AIDS Departmen or major. to teach the teacher who involved teir self in the HIV Teacher Training.
The third is Jointly at establesh the Curriculum of Clasrrom teaching.


Regards

Francelino da Silva Correia


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Homayoon Shirzad on May 27, 2009, 04:11:34 am
Dear beloved friends,

I am writing you from Afghanistan.  A place where it is so prone to HIV diseases and risks due to highly illigal migrations and lack of awareness.

In Afghanistan the ministry of Public Health with the support of the international communities implemented various HIV Aids awareness programs and it has given very good result and I can share my expereince with you as bellow.

1. As in Afghanistan, the Mullahs/Imams are the most respected and trusted bodies of each village/mosque from relegios point of view so the organization I work with trained these Mullahas so that during their Fridays talks in the mosque and also by village visit preaches the subjects of HIV Aids and related diseases to communities. How we did was we trained the Mullahs as ToT for 20 days then they were sent to the villages to train 10 other Mullas and then those 10 other Mullas will act in their mosques. This way we were 100 successful as in Islamic countries people listen to Mullas a lot.

However, it is also very good idea to train school teachers to take led in informing all studenst and other communities in regard to HIV Aids.

I don't think it is good to pay teachers for what they talk about HIV Aids as in the long run it can be another disaster to afford it. Teachers could part of their duty teach this subject.

This was my brief expereince.
Thanks,
Homayoon Shirzad
from Afghanistan


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: PP_Gile on May 27, 2009, 07:15:39 am
Yes, UNAIDS and UNESCO could play pivotal role on standardization of curriculum, building /enhancing the capacity of educational institutions, HIV/AIDS focal points as well as relevant teachers, participate in policy revisions and redesigning strategies, if appropriate, organize consultative and best practice sharing fora, facilitate knowledge transfer adn knowledge management society,and skill transfer opportunities.



Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 27, 2009, 10:22:01 am
A contribution received via email from Mulindwa Augustine in Uganda:

To the question of who should teach  about the HIV/AIDS in the schools, i suggest that it should be the teachers just because they are being listened to with much care than others.Students tend to take their teachers more seriously.
Headteachers should play arole too in teaching just because of the authoritative nature of their job at schools .That will make their teaching very cardinal.
 
In Uganda however,the Ministry of Education and sports,is initiating the teaching of sex education in schools. It is done through NCDC(National Curriculum Development Center).After pilotting of it then it will be implemented by the teachers.
 
Now the parents are objecting the idea already just because it is contradicting with cultural norms .In Buganda forinstance where i come from,the work is done by helders.Here the teaching of the girls is done by the aunts and the boys by the their auncles and at later stage when the brains are well developed to recieve such information.
 
But there is also the issue of the media where students learn good and bad from tvs, radios and the newspapers not to mention the internet for those in city centers.So the idea of preserving good norms like those that protect virginity and prevent fornication in  an african setting is challenged by the influence of the media .
 
So i strongly urge teachers to do teach about HIV/AIDS because it has claimed lives of anumber of their students,fellow teachers, and relatives despite the strong cultural norms and values being pursued and mantained.It shows that there are some loopholes in the practice and that is what our societies call ''WESTERNISATION'' the young pupils and students they want to copy what they watch in movies especially issues to do with love.
 
I say so because now there is nothing much to hide from students of this generation as they learn alot from their suroundigs like in the ghettos where some of our students are being raised.
And  here in Uganda a number of parents are too shy to talk about things relating to sex which is the major cause of AIDS.
 
Healthy workers would be very vital in doing the work of teaching but the man power is limitted and they are always bussy at their work places and their personal clinics and our government can not facilitate such aprogramme because of limitted funds that's why they
want to make it asubject.
 
In anutshell, how can one deal with the idea of teaching about sex in abid derive causes of it and it's impact with out indirectly telling students to practice it.

Good regards

mulindwa augustine


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 27, 2009, 11:03:39 am
A contribution received via email from Kisakye Julius in Uganda:

There is an education sector policy on HIV in Uganda. The education sector HIV/AIDS work place policy in Uganda is silent about teacher training and HIV. However the Ministry has integrated HIV education, information and communication within the entire education system and levels as appropriately as the level may require.

Regarding the professional conduct, the policy is very clear in a section 6.0-6.2 “The responsibility of the employer, employees and learners” professional ethics are emphasized.

According to the HIV work place policy of the Ministry of Education, supervision for the implementation is clearly indicated in the section 7.0-7.1 with the Ministry having the HIV/AIDS sector coordinator as the overall supervisor.

The policy is also clear as far as the workplace is concerned. The policy promotes non-discrimination for the HIV positive workers and learners at the workplace.

The policy provides for the availability of free medical care for the education sector employees, their families and the learners. The problem however is that HIV/AIDS has never been fully accepted as a normal disease by some members in our society, so stigma and discrimination has continued to exist in some sections of the workplace.

Professional bodies representing teachers were involved in the policy development but reviewers are yet to be undertaken.

UNATU: Uganda National Teachers Union and TAAG have been involved.

The outcomes of the policy are yet to be effectively monitored by the Ministry but  efforts are being made to set up a system of monitoring.

The policy booklets are being provided to all education institutions but they are still very few compared to the need.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Mark_Omolade on May 27, 2009, 01:49:22 pm
 Dear Moderator! Please,l'll suggest to UNESCO and UNAIDS to come up with a policy for governments in countries to integrate  teaching  of sex education and HIV/AIDS  as part  of subjects to their curriculum right from primary schools,by that method it will not look like a taboo or strange thing among some cultures in Africa. Teachers and Head Teachers are in the best position to teach HIV/AIDS.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Inon Schenker on May 27, 2009, 04:41:30 pm
Looking back at the first formal consultation on School AIDS Education organized in 1988 by then the only global AIDS Program (of WHO, headed by late Prof Jonathan Mann) - we must acknowledge the major achievements globally and in many nations in addressing the needs of teachers and learners in HIV prevention. Shortcomings are evident too, and if we look at the relatively small number of studies documenting scientifically success of teachers in preventing new HIV infections - we could be discouraged.
Let me share some insights from the Middle East; a multi cultural, neglected, problematic region with a low HIV prevalence and incidence:
1) Teachers were recognized as loyal partners in HIV prevention very late into the epidemic. Curricula development (vs. teachers' training) was considered a priority, yet it lacked the necessary skills-building approaches
2) Religion (Islam in most countries of the region, Judaism in Israel) is a barrier to date in introducing meaningful messages on prevention. Teachers in the more fundamental countries are under constant pressures not to include certain messages when talking about HIV/AIDS prevention. They are also not trained comprehensively to be able to better deliver in this area.
3) Like other regions, competing subjects drive HIV/AIDS to the bottom of the list. The very low HIV prevalence is not supporting a change in this policy or prioritization.
4) With Arabic being the most spoken language in MENA, lack of teaching and training materials in Arabic makes it difficult for teachers to have (even basic) tools. A great effort of UNESCO/Beirut helped mobilize MOE to be more participatory in this area but with limited follow up. I remember well when the first comprehensive curriculum (including manual, flipcharts, posters etc) on Preventive HIV/AIDS Education in Arabic was published in 1995 it was widely distributed in the region despite the fact that it originated in..... Israel. There were no other materials at that time. Things have changed by now. UNICEF complied information on HIV prevention projects in the region and the publication is available on line.
5) At the same time several regional initiatives on teachers and HIV prevention in MENA are best practice and hailed by the international community. One of them is "HIV as a Bridge for Peace" which brought together HIV educators to develop a regional network on HIV/AIDS education. More than 500 Egyptian, Jordanian, Turkish, Moroccan and (mostly) Palestinian and Israeli teachers and other AIDS Educators met in Jerusalem\Bethlehem in a series of workshops and developed a most impressive network. The participants in that project proved that fighting AIDS could do more than prevent new infections - it may be another road to reconciliation.

Dr Inon Schenker, PhD MPH
Senior HIV/AIDS Prevention Specialist
Global Health Consultant   


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 27, 2009, 06:25:54 pm
Corruption is everywhere in Kenya and the HIV/AIDS fund is not spared either. First it is in the office of the president where the fund is administred fro since HIV/AIDS was declared a national disaster, which gives the president powers to use all means possible to combat the disaster. The former chairlady was taken to court over claims of corruption regarding HIV/AIDS funds.
The experts are not spared either, the ministry of education runs the HIV/AIDS funds from their offices instead of the right departments within the ministry like Kenya Institute of Education (KIE) who are suppossed to normally develop a curriculum and train teachers and provide resources for the same. Instead KIE still develops the curriculum while the ministry officials organize ad hoc training for teachers. Reason, they can control the funds while paying themselves allowances for taking part in organising trainings. Right now life skills curriculum is already released by KIE to schools and nothing is happening about life skills in primary teacher training colleges in terms of training teachers who are supposed to teach the life skills in schools.
Pricipals and head teachers are corrupt too, they pend their names and their administion on nearly all training opportunities on HIV/AIDS just because they get paid allowances for attending such courses especially if it involves travelling too. Yet they and most of these head of departments and dean of curriculum do not actually teach in the classrooms of their respective colleges.
As for inspection and follow-up, I think forms just get filled in the offices and forwarded to the ministry without actually suprvising the actual teaching. Carry any small scale survey and you will be amased at how many institutions in Kenya do not teach about HIV/AIDS despite it having been integrated in the curriculum as per the education sector policy.
Should HIV/AIDS be taught as a standalone examinable subject for it to be taught and time and resources including personnel be allocated?


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Fadokun James Banji on May 28, 2009, 12:26:21 am
Dear Moderator! Please,l'll suggest to UNESCO and UNAIDS to come up with a policy for governments in countries to integrate  teaching  of sex education and HIV/AIDS  as part  of subjects to their curriculum right from primary schools,by that method it will not look like a taboo or strange thing among some cultures in Africa. Teachers and Head Teachers are in the best position to teach HIV/AIDS.

UNESCO and other UN agencies such as UNICEF,UNFPA as well as bilateral agencies like DFID and USAID have been making effort in  encouraging government in Africa to integrate sexuality education into the curriculum of primary to teriary level.Nigeria has for instance integrated Family Life HIV/AIDS education into core subjects at primary to secondary levels.At the tertiary level,Family Life and Emerging Health Issues has also beeb integrated into the curriculum of Colleges of Education.Teachers and lecturers have also been trained on how to use the curriculum.The  problem however in the Nigerian context is mass producing the curriculum so that teachers will have access to them .The initial fifty thousand copies distributed could not go round.
I agree that UNESCO and UNAIDS IATT need to re-echo its strategies for HIV/AIDS preventive education,but governments and their education Ministries and agencies need to take ownership of this efforts inorder for it to make a huge impact and for it to be sustained
In Nigerian situation for Instance UNESCO provided technical support for the development of the National HIV/AIDS Policy for the Education Sector.The policy actually stresses the strategic importance of integrating Family Life and HIV/AIDS Education Curriculum into all levels of the education sector.So each country has to be on the driver seat to drive the process while  technical supportwill be provided from UNESCO and other development
partners
James Fadokun
Nigeria


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Francelino da Silva Correia on May 28, 2009, 03:14:40 am

For every sections in my country now, The Ministry Of health have managemnt tools and good relations with other Organization International to implements this issues. and good results at recently.
but at Education level we have pregress the programme about the management tools to Monitor the teacher absences replacement transfer  and training skills.

In my country many organization Involved in HIV and AIDS to hindering the progress.
I sew they have good implement together Community society and also UN Agencies.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 28, 2009, 09:58:38 am
A response from Nigeria to the questions raised in the daily summary of 27 May

On Curruption and Progress
 
In Nigeria, hardly can we see any sector without elements of curruption. The parastatal of the government at the three levels of government is also characterised with corruption.The story of corruption hidering the progress and efforts of individuals and organisation involved in HIV and AIDS is also the case in Nigeria.
 
On Management Tools
 
In Nigeria, we have management tools which are being used to monitor teacher s' absenteesm, replacement, transfer and training.   
 
Dr. T. L. Adepoju
Obafemi Awolowo University
Nigeria


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 28, 2009, 05:41:50 pm
Concerning the topic for tomorrow Should HIV and AIDS be taught as a standalone subject in schools so that it can receive the appropriate allocation of time, resources and personnel?
If people go to school is to learn how to improve on life. I think hiv/aids should be given equal importance like arithmetics, biology and goegraphy. HIV/AIDS is a real problem and needs special attention. It should be thought as a standalone subject.
In so doing, more and adequate messages will be passed on to the children.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 28, 2009, 05:47:15 pm
If we need to safe lives, make the world a better place and to divert some of the huge some of money being spent on hiv/aids, we need to start educate especially the children and in so doing, they have to be be passed quantity and quality knowledge and to acheive this, hiv/aids lessons have to be given more time and to have more time, it has to be thought as a subject.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Managa on May 28, 2009, 08:59:30 pm
Dear Colleagues,

My apologies for not being able to participate as I had intended to. I have been perusing the discussions and want to advise that as a part of the Higher Education HIV and AIDS Programme in South Africa, we have done some research exploring the Roles of educators in mitigating the impact of HIV - this looks at educators across three sectors - schools, the FET sector and higher education and then we piloted an HIV module at teacher education faculties - looking at pre-service and in-service.

The preliminary findings and results have been very interesting and I will be happy to share some thoughts with anyone that may be interested and therefore invite you to contact me.....


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Moses_OrweOnyango on May 28, 2009, 09:54:46 pm
Interviewees in a research I conducted in Kenya on the status of the integrated HIV prevention education in learning institutions suggested that HIV/AIDS should be taught as a standalone examinble subject for it to be taught comphensively. A University in Kenya has introduced a compulsory HIV unit for all the students taking bachelor of education. The unit is graded and thus programmed, resourced and staffed. This is the way to go in our overcrowded examination driven curriculum where what is valued is tested and thus get taught!


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Francelino da Silva Correia on May 29, 2009, 02:46:15 am
 management of Tools:
In Timop Leste we have the management tools to monitor the teacher absences during the abandonance their Duties or obligations, my be Mutation to other location, receive the sansation expulsion etc.

management hindaring and progress:
 Departement education and department of health together NGoS International have organized all activities and planning  to support the Hinder and corruptions in Timor Leste to related to the HIV and AIDS 



Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 29, 2009, 11:03:51 am
Dear Managa,
Your research is very interesting. i will like to share the result of the findings.
best regards



Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Francelino da Silva Correia on May 29, 2009, 11:34:29 am
For my opinions :
How to increasing the capacity of selection of the teacher to teach the HIV/AIDS :
 The first steps are : Must good selection from the local area and origin people and also teacher from the urban or rural.

The management supports fro structure are :
Government, International NGO's, other agencies must support the Financial aid. it  will be involeved also Intergovernmental how to support the Financial. leaderships training how to organized the programme at fields.

Who will be involved or selected/Nominated in this program must be good skills attitude behavior, and also excelent in the theory degree.
my be together in this item to strengthened the capacity.all members in the trained to HIV/AIDS.
Thank you.
By
Francelino da Silva Correia

 


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Eileen Nkwanga on May 29, 2009, 03:06:18 pm
I am raising questions on the sustainability and intensification of current efforts to address HIV/AIDS throughout the education sector.

1. How sustainable are the current activities in HIV and AIDS given the reliance on Overseas Development Assistance?  I note that Peter Piot stated some time back that current efforts would need to be sustained for decades if there were to be permanent benefits.  Can funding levels be sustained in view of the current financial crisis in USA and Europe?
2. Where are ODA funds going?  Are they being properly accounted for?
3.  How can the transparency of budgeting and accounting be improved especially where ODA funds are incorporated in national budgets?  How can it be ensured that
funds are released in a timely fashion?
4.  If the time comes that donors no longer drive the process of addressing HIV/AIDS are governments sufficiently committed to the process and to providing the necessary human, financial and material resources in future?  In countries with shaky economies where will the funds come from?


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on May 29, 2009, 03:57:20 pm
Dear Colleagues,

My apologies for not being able to participate as I had intended to. I have been perusing the discussions and want to advise that as a part of the Higher Education HIV and AIDS Programme in South Africa, we have done some research exploring the Roles of educators in mitigating the impact of HIV - this looks at educators across three sectors - schools, the FET sector and higher education and then we piloted an HIV module at teacher education faculties - looking at pre-service and in-service.

The preliminary findings and results have been very interesting and I will be happy to share some thoughts with anyone that may be interested and therefore invite you to contact me.....

More information at www.heaids.org.za or to contact Managa - managa@hesa.org.za


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Arrey Emmanuel Enow on May 29, 2009, 05:36:31 pm
I will like to talk in the bottom of my mind that if half the funds allocated for hiv/aids were used properly, a greater impact could have been felt than today. So even in the presence of the financial crisis of the usa and europe, if the small that is there is properly managed, we shall make it with more results.
I will not be afraid to tell you that the ODA funds are not properly being managed and there is no account for it. I will like to suggest that the funders should follow and strictly suppervise the funds.
How can the transparency of budgeting and accounting be improved especially where ODA funds are incorporated in national budgets?  For this question, in will like to suggest that suggest that special commitee of reputable individuals be put to supervise the projects and in the process of awarding of funding.
If the time comes that donors no longer drive the process of addressing HIV/AIDS are governments sufficiently committed to the process and to providing the necessary human, financial and material resources in future?  In countries with shaky economies where will the funds come from? For this question, it is a difficult but i will asure you that every government who work for the people will never lake the resources to save the people.
Truly if we neglet this issue of corruption, we shall always live suffering in vein in the struggle for this deadly disease hiv/aids.


Title: Re: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion
Post by: Forum Moderator on June 02, 2009, 10:46:25 am
Final contribution from Swaziland

Involving teachers in HIV prevention – policy and management implications

• What mechanisms are in place in your country or the country/ies in which you work to support teachers to address HIV and AIDS? Consider, for example, the relative importance of: curriculum and associated instructional aids, support from teachers’ unions, school management and administration, links with parents and communities, quality assurance and support systems, and the establishment of a safe and secure institutional environment.

Swaziland has established a coordinating unit under the DPM’s office called the National Children’s Coordinating Unit (NCCU). Within the education sector there’s the coordinating body called HIV Education Sector Committee (HESCO) that was established to coordinate HIV interventions within the education sector.

The curriculum has been reviewed to incorporate HIV and AIDS education by the National Curriculum Centre (NCC), though not evenly distributed to all the subjects. Non Govermental Organisations (NGO’s) and UN agencies do produce IEC materials such as posters, pamphlets and audio visual materials help to promote awareness and knowledge to both teachers and students.

The Swaziland National Association of Teachers (SNAT) has established an Educational Committee which deals with issues of gender and health including HIV and AIDS to both teachers and students.

The school management and administration is supportive to any health programmes initiated by the Schools Health Unit under the Ministry of Health e.g school visits and deworming programmes.

The Ministry of Education and Training has adopted a programme called the Schools as Centre of Care and Support (SCCS) which aims at facilitating strong links between schools and communities in fighting HIV and AIDS and its consequences. This programme has now been adopted by SADAC as a regional programme under the name “Care and Support for Teaching and Learning” (CSTL) with the help of UNICEF and MiET.

The government has employed senior inspectors for all subjects and chief inspectors for primary schools, secondary/high and colleges/tertiary.

The Teaching Service Commission (TSC) hires teachers either permanent or on specified contracts for their job security and also monitors their conduct and relations with students to eliminate intimate relations between the two.

• Is there an education sector policy in your country or the country/ies in which you work and how does it address issues such as teacher training, professional conduct, supervision, and the workplace? Were professional bodies representing teachers involved in its development and review? How are the outcomes monitored?

The Ministry of Education and Training has developed National Policy Statement on Education. This policy states that teacher education is in two fold i.e pre-service and in – service training.

The Education Act, The Teaching Service Act and Regulations and the Schools Accounting Regulations have been formulated to monitor professional conduct and supervision.

The Swaziland National Association of Teachers and all education sector stakeholders were represented in the development of these policies and acts. It is usability of the policies and acts which have uncovered loopholes hence the need for them to be reviewed.

• In your opinion, how does the process by which teachers are selected to teach about HIV affect their motivation to take on this task? In what way(s) do you think the teacher selection process impacts on the outcomes of their work? What recommendations might you make to improve the process?

The teachers who are selected to teach about HIV are those doing guidance also and counselling, so they feel they are overwhelmed with work and subsequently they should be paid for this since it is assumed as extra work.

Each school should have a teacher to solely teach about guidance and health issues including HIV and AIDS.

• What are the incentives and the disincentives for teachers in becoming involved in HIV education? Is compensation, financial or otherwise, provided and is this seen to be fair?

There are disincentives for the teachers in that being involved in this adds to their normal school workload and there is no compensation which is not fair. However there’s an incentive in that they are continiously trained (short term) which enriches their CV’s and exposes them to other fields and possible future employment in other organization.

• What additional managerial capacity needs to be built, or what existing capacity needs to be strengthened, to respond to HIV effectively?
Mainstreaming of HIV and AIDS education into the school curriculum is still essential. Not necessarily incorporated in each subject.