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E-forum on Treatment, Care and Support for HIV and AIDS in Higher Education Institutions. This forum is held at the request of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Team on Education Working Group on Higher Education (WGHE). It aims to share experiences and good practices on the management of HIV and AIDS within higher education institutions, particularly universities as centres of treatment, care and support.

The forum will be open from 4 to 15 October 2010.

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Author Topic: Pre- and in-service training: Questions for discussion  (Read 56262 times)
David Ross
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« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2009, 04:23:43 pm »

I just wanted to add to what my colleague Koronel Kema of AMREF posted about the MEMA kwa Vijana Project in Tanzania. This project has a website www.memakwavijana.org where you can get the English language versions of the materials that were used for training teachers in how they could teach sessions in sexual and reproductive health, including detailed lesson plans, a teachers' resource book, etc. There are also a large number of other materials: publications, policy briefs, technical briefs, reports, a detailed description of the project and the interventions, etc. Also the results of the very rigorous evaluation (within a cluster randomised trial) of the impact of the interventions on HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, pregnancy, reported behaviours, atttitudes, and knowledge, which has been conducted since 1998, with over 8 years of follow-up. The most recent follow-up survey within the trial included over 14,000 young people and was completed in 2008. There are also links to an article about the results of detailed process evaluation, etc. We hope this will be useful to others working in the field.

David Ross, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
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J_Mmbando
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« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2009, 04:45:05 pm »

In my experiance here n Tanzania HIV/AIDS teachning in school is very rear to see teachers are responsible for teaching these although the government officily as the curriculum at school, and also there is no traingnig for teachers like others sector to keep the updated with Virus and Drugs so teachers known nothing in the trining, but you will find most of the NGO people have training always around without even introducing to teachers these is one of the challenges we face here, that why you will see these NGO people go to school for teaching
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David Ross
teachers


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« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2009, 04:59:23 pm »

Thanks for the comment about teachers in Tanzanian primary schools. I agree that in some programmes NGOs may have done sexual health and HIV prevention teaching in schools without active involvement of the teachers themselves. However, the MEMA kwa Vijana in-school interventions are all delivered by government (Ministry of Education and Vocational Training) primary school teachers within the normal school classes. And these are supervised by the Ward Education Cordinators and, in turn, by the District Inspectors of Schools. Also, the teachers are trained by a team of District Inspectors and Academic Officers.

David Ross, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine of the MEMA kwa Vijana Project Team
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Mark_Omolade
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« Reply #18 on: May 20, 2009, 05:29:54 pm »

Dear Participants, l wish to let you understand the great idea in networking. As at the time l'm sending this contribution l have serious network  with many universities in Nigeria  on the issue of setting up counselling units on pre and in service training of teachers on HIV/AIDS to integrate it into their curriculum.
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M_Juma
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« Reply #19 on: May 20, 2009, 06:18:57 pm »

The need for conducting a researc on in service training on the prevention for HIV transimission should be done to Teachers in Tanzania.


Mgesi Juma
from AFRICAN uNION People' Empowerment Foundation (AUPEF)
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« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2009, 10:22:37 am »

Contribution received via email from Agnes Kabanda Kyambadde:

The Uganda  National Union for teachers (UNATU) has been engaged in various initiatives to combat HIV/AIDs amongst the Ugandan teachers.  Last year UNATU supported and distributed the Ministry of Education’s Workplace Policy on HIV and AIDS in about a quarter of schools in Uganda.

The Ministry of Education in Uganda has developed an education work place policy on HIV/AIDS.  Challenges were experienced at the dissemination level.  UNATU printed and distributed the policy to three quarters of schools across Uganda. But in many cases the policy ends up on the principal’s shelf. So even if teachers are aware that it exists, they remain no wiser to the content.

UNATU’s has gone ahead to make a popular version of the policy that can appear on the board for all teachers to access. This is their plan for 2009.  I believe all teachers in the developing world need a version of this policy.

I happened to be working with the Ministry of Education as partners at the time this policy was developed in 2003. I have its version and am ready to share it with all other partners who could also use it in their country education sector HIV/AIDs programs

HIV/AIDS remains a big problem in Uganda despite the so many programs to address it. We still need to share with all the other nations on how they are over coming it.   Teachers in Uganda have also formed an Anti Aids Action Groups to address the problems faced by teachers living with HIV/AIDS. This is headed by Julius Kisakye a Teacher living with HIV/AIDS.  Their basic problem is taking off as an NGO.
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« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2009, 10:25:38 am »

A contribution received from CIL SIDA

Au Togo, pour le moment, certains professeurs de la SVT se basent sur des documents ayant des informations sur le VIH/Sida pour faire leur enseignement. Mais aujourd'hui, l'ATBEF est entrain d'initier un projet d'éducation sexuelle sur les bancs d'écoles. Notre organisation a en cette année académique 2008-2009 initié un projet pilote dans un établissement scolaire secondaire. Le projet consiste à faire un débat sur la sexualité liée au VIH/Sida aux heures libres dans les classes de 6è et 5è. L'année académique prochaine, ce projet va être réalisé dans d'autres établissements secondaires.
 
In Togo, for the time, some SVT teachers were based on documents with information on HIV / AIDS to their teaching. But now the ATBEF is in the process of initiating a project of sex education to school. Our organization has in the academic year 2008-2009 initiated a pilot project in a secondary school. The project consists of a debate about sex-related HIV / AIDS to free time in grades 5th and 6th. The next academic year, this project will be done in other schools.
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« Reply #22 on: May 22, 2009, 10:26:32 am »

Contribution received via email from Ethiopia:

There are many acievements: good leadership and political commitment, agressive mainstreaming into the curriculum and co-curricular activities, community engagements, sensitization and conferences(though not adequate and strategically planned and implemented in some institutions due to capacity and resource constraints), interest of the customers/students/parents on the issue, relative changes in attitudes,...these are acheivements. The major challenges: poverty, lack of good governance, still silences and not openness due to cultural and social pressures--about sex, sexuality, HIV..for your surprise talking about sex, sexual relationship , HIV prevention through condom..still associated with loose behavior.....to mitigate these challenges..efforts of mainstreaming not only in shools or curricula but into family institutions, religious instituions..good but not really efficient/effective...
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« Reply #23 on: May 22, 2009, 10:27:51 am »

Received via e-mail from Zambia

The biggest problem in schools is that many pupils especially in the rural areas lack the basic necassities. Therefore, apart from using the conventional methods of teaching AIDS and HIV, there is need to devise methods that will allow teachers to access pupils through their parents and guidance. A few Parent Teachers Associations, in Zambia, have used their forum to educate parents so that the parents can educate their children. There is prejudice in AIDS and HIV messages and some pupils are generally fatigued and they ignore such messages for this reason.   

Patson Phiri
Press Association of Zambia
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« Reply #24 on: May 22, 2009, 10:30:40 am »

DAMEGO-COTONFRANC Jean Pierre Hope of the Association for Peace in Central Africa. CAR,

I think I am of the opinion to the statement by Mr David Ross, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. And let me point out that this method I would say a little work at CAR  we consider the initiative to strengthen training of sexual and reproductive health. In Bangui, we worked in collaboration with NGO with similar objectives as ours and we have put in place in 12 regions of the CAR starting with former teachers, students and pupils on teachers, they are given training of trainers that they too can finally return what they have learned to students, that's the first goal.

The second objective is to train teachers parents, ie positions in the conflict or there are no lessons on the trains so that they can transmit their élèves.A Currently, we are go seeking to develop a structure called the Center for recruitment of persons living with HIV / AIDS and is in good voice, so to find the best strategy, it is sufficient to strengthen the frameworks above and that this will enable us to eradicate this problem to find as what we must do to ensure that these same people can respect and take care to avoid even a possible epidemic.

Jean Pierre DAMEGO-COTONFRANC of Central African Republic
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
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« Reply #25 on: May 22, 2009, 10:40:08 am »

In my rural communities in Cameroon, the word sex is still considered a taboo. not to talk of a teacher mentioning it to the pupils in class. With my experience in my primary school in which i graduated, when i called the word sex when i was giving the children lesson on HIV/AIDS, more than half of the class bend their heads down. This shows that they are not use to the word. I asked the teacher after the lesson why it happened and he told my this word is not often used and when you use it, you will be stigmatised as being "raw".
This i think is a problem that originates from the teachers training leading to inappropriate approach to the pupils.
One other thing that i noticed was that most of these teachers in the rural areas are parent teachers. These teachers had no formal training as teachers.
I think teachers should be well trained in sex education and sent more especially in the rural areas of Cameroon.
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
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« Reply #26 on: May 22, 2009, 10:46:31 am »

The Issue of Pre-and in-service training for HIV/AIDS should be focus more on the rural areas than the urban areas and UNESCO should take a leading hand in doing this.
In most war torn countries and countries who had suffered from crises for a long time, more emphasis is always focus in the urban areas and leaving the most vulnerable in the rural areas more Open to HIV/AIDS and the conseguencies.
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Zulaikatu Usman Momodu
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« Reply #27 on: May 25, 2009, 05:21:10 pm »

• How are HIV and AIDS addressed in pre-service teacher training in your country or the country/ies in which you work? What opportunities are there for continuous professional development on HIV and AIDS for teachers and what is the content, process and duration of the training? Are both pre- and in-service training opportunities offered and what is the coverage?
In my country Nigeria, the Pre-service stand alone curriculum is in place.The Family Life and Emerging Health Issues curriculum  was developed by the National Commission for Colleges of Education which is a requlatory body for teacher education in collaboration with Federal Ministry of Education and Action Health Incorporated developed. The curriculum content include HIV&AIDS, Life skills, Faciltation techniques and other health issues and is offered for one year as a compulsory course in all teacher training Institutions. HIV&AIDS issues are also integrated in relevant subject areas in Colleges of Education i.e our teacher training colleges.
Some Universities in Nigeria also offer Diploma courses in HIV&AIDS. Its a two year course
 
While the In-service training is implemented nation wide in line with the National Guideline for the Implementation of Family Life HIV&AIDS Education Curriculum. FLHE is an age appropreriat, spirally arranged and gender sensive HIV&AIDS curriculum for primary and secondary schools The in-service training is a seven day training on curriculum content, faciltation techniques and two or three days practicum (practicalising what has been taught). The classroom delivery of the FLHE curriculum is according to the socio-cultural peculiarities of where is is being taught

• Are teachers trained and supported to encourage participatory, child-centred and age-appropriate learning which helps learners to personalise the information, and address the risk and protective factors related to HIV? Are teachers equipped with a broad repertoire of teaching methodologies and instructional skills
Yes they. Even if they were not initiallty trained to do that the in-service training focus on that and teaching methodologies relevant to life skills

• In your experience, are teacher training strategies for HIV prevention different in low versus high prevalence settings? In what way(s) and why?
In NIgeria we make use of the same delivery process in both high and low prvelence setting. However,the only difference is that areas with high prevelence started classroom delivery of the curriculum earlier than those with low prevelence

• Which interventions produce demonstrable improvements in teacher effectiveness to teach about HIV and AIDS? Consider and comment on different approaches.

• There is considerable evidence that many teachers have difficulties addressing sex – the main mode of HIV transmission – when teaching about HIV. In your country or the country/ies in which you work, how does teacher training approach the building of teachers’ confidence to address these topics in the classroom setting? What other kinds of support may teachers need in order to deal effectively with this issue?
This is also a challenge to effective teaching of the FLHE curricul, Hence the curriculum is structured in such a way that the core sex issues are taught in the senoir secondary level. The training on FLHE curricum implementation has relevent topic that address the issue raised above. So that at the end of the training teachers gain confidence in teaching the traditional hard to discuss topics 
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Mark_Omolade
teachers


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« Reply #28 on: May 25, 2009, 11:31:40 pm »

I think pre- and in-service training for HIV/AIDS teachers needs to be given more attention at the rural community in every country,so UNESCO should begin campaign on this idea.
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« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2009, 10:10:59 am »

The following message comes from Eric Allemano, Consultant to Catholic Relief Services/Haiti and is addressed mainly to David Ross, Arrey Emmanuel Enow and Jean-Pierre Damego-Cotonfranc


I have found many of the forum exchanges to be interesting and instructive in terms of raising issues that must be dealt with in designing curriculum and teacher training on HIV/AIDS and life skills. I am beginning an assignment for an NGO that will help the Ministry of Education of Haiti to design a curriculum on these subjects for both primary and secondary schools. I have been asked to find examples of "good practices" to submit to the Hatian team to study and adapt to the local school environment. For that reason, I am looking for French-language curricula in HIV/AIDS and life skills which include both student and teacher materials. I have reviewed the Mema Kwa Vijana materials from Tanzania and they look good. I am glad to hear that they have been evaluated and are shown to be effective. The problem (for Haiti) is that they are in Kiswahili and English. Is there anything similar available in French? I would like to be able to discuss issues with those who have designed and implemented curricula in their countries in order to share these experiences with the Hatian counterparts. I look forward to hearing from you.
Many thanks,
Eric Allemano


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