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The forum will be open from 4 to 15 October 2010.

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Author Topic: Teacher training to create a safe environment: Questions for discussion  (Read 52945 times)
Regina Lialabi Handongwe
teachers


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« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2009, 09:00:15 am »

In Zambia trainings for teachers in Counselling and Psychosocial Support for all children including those affected by HIV are conducted by the Ministry of Education and other stakeholders supporting the ministry's efforts. The ministry of education department of counselling trains teachers on counseling and providing psychosocial support to children affected by HIV.

This is not sustainable because only one teacher at a school is trained and there is no sharing of information with other teachers in the schools, or lack of interest and support by other teachers.

Other mechanisms that can be put in place are training other stakeholders to ensure that they provide support to the teachers in this area. Camfed will conduct training for head teachers, school based committees, mother support groups, resource team members and young women on the Camfed programme as trouble shoots in counselling and psychosocial support.


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Regina Lialabi Handongwe
teachers


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« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2009, 09:10:19 am »

The role of teachers in ensuring that schools are safe places.
The government of Zambia's committment to "providing a school environment where learners' rights are protected and their safety assure" the Ministry of Education National Implementation Framework-NIF of 2008-2010, the National Child Friendly School Initative introduced by Ministry of Education with support from UNICEF in 1998 and the Schools as Centers of Care and Support (SCCS) prompted Camfed Zambia to launch an advocacy on child protection in Zambian schools.

Teachers have been trained on identifying all forms of child abuse and the referral systems within their communities where abused children can be refered to.

Teachers can use their power to help prevent HIV by ensuring that the child protection policy is implemented in schools, and by also ensuring that all forms of child abuse cases are reported and perpetrators are prosecuted.
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Regina Lialabi Handongwe
teachers


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« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2009, 09:18:07 am »

Harmful practices- Despite codes of put in place to prevent and address reported cases of abuse there are still reported cases of sexual interactions between teachers and learners in rural areas. For example a case of sexual interactions is reported to the head teacher, who reports to the District Education Office, who reports to the Provincial Education Office who then also reports to the Teaching Service Commission at Nationa Level. Meanwhile when all this is going on the teacher is still in school and teaching.

The when the case gets to the teaching service commission there is not enough evidence to dismiss the teacher who is alleged to be having sexual interaction with learners.

This process is too long and complicated there should be a situation where the head teacher, PTA, teachers and teacher unions at District level can handle such cases without much delay.
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« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2009, 10:27:43 am »

Contribution received via email from Ethiopia:

Teachers' role is immense(positively)..it needs empirical evidence and basic or action research in this area. But in general the overwhelming majoriy of teachers playing pivotal role- good teacher means good parent..act as a role model(positive role model). Indeed there might be other side(but parents/family, media, law enforcement institutions, schools,..should work together in harmony)
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« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2009, 10:33:22 am »

Central African Republic, strategies to fight against stigma and discrimination of HIV requires a very broad awareness of the school as students. If our days Teachers read much affected by this scourge, it is because these teachers are left to be seduced by their students or by their students, this case is common in RCA and we have provided training in these places and we always continue to be donner.Il awareness that these affect all layers of the persons concerned.

Jean Pierre  DAMEGO-COTONFRANC of Central African
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Eileen Nkwanga
teachers


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« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2009, 06:33:10 pm »

I would like to agree and strengthen much of what Regina has written about the safety of school children in Zambia.  I have recently discussed this issue with many education staff at various levels of the system.

1. I agree that there are far too few teachers trained in Counselling and Support through either NISTCOL, occasional in-service courses or other providers.  I have been told by several school teachers that, even if one teacher is trained, it does not mean that he or she passes on what has been learnt to others. However, at one basic school the staff are talking amongst themselves and have joined forces to present a series of talks for the students at assemblies on various health issues associated with HIV/AIDS.  These include nutrition, self-esteem, peer pressure, prevention, and advocacy.

2.  Staff at the provincial and district levels and the teaching service are agreed that the procedures for 'disciplining' teachers who have abused their students are very cumbersome.  They also point out that few cases are reported for several reasons. (a) The child may fear to report the teacher because he/she is an authority figure, has control over the child's school progress or offers money or other incentives.  (b) The guardian, parents and/or community may benefit financially for keeping silence.  It was pointed out that this may well be the case where the guardian (often the grandmother) has several family members to support and has no source of income.
(c) The teacher still ensures status within the community and the child may not be believed. (d) The girl child is still considered to have lower status than a boy.

I was also informed that, if cases are reported, they are seldom upheld by the various levels of management that Regina has described.

Perhaps we should also consider sexual relationships that may exist between male and female teachers and how traditional gender roles come into play in both rural and urban areas.

Eileen
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2009, 03:19:32 pm »

I think training teacher seperating gender willnot be a good idear. teacher male and female should be trained together.
When we talke of training in psychological support for teachers i think in Cameroon that is not yet done but still to start. Many assosiations and NGOs who talk of psychosocial support are just there to give books, food, assist in paying fees but do not really touch on the pschic aspect.
One reason is due to lack of training and experts. For example if somebody study law and biology and finds his/her self as a school counsellor he/she is not a psychologist and cannot do what a psychologist do. Even those who are phschologist need more practicals.
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
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« Reply #22 on: May 24, 2009, 03:27:38 pm »

 In Cameroon,the code for protecting the pupils for child abuse is there but the problem is that  it is not being applied. take for example a teacher abuses a pupil and threatens her and the pupil is ignorant of the fact that she had been abused and can go to the head teacher or the parents and report. I think to address this issue,  sex education must be fully implemented and the pupils and students counselled. This will even make the teachers to be afraid that the pupils know their right and they can take them to justice and higher authorities if they are abused.
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« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2009, 10:20:24 am »

A message from Uganda:

Hello

Here in uganda the students with stigma have been involved in a number of co curricula activities that range from :
Dancing, singing among others .These activities have made these students so happy and have reduced the stress of living with the disease.
 
Teachers also carry out serious counselling to the students with the virus and those with out it.This has made them feel that they are not forsaken by the fellow students.And it has acted as a cardinal role in changing the way of life of these students and making them mitigate  that kind of of life.
 
And in some good schools of the wealthy class, students with the HIV are occassionally reminded to their drugs on time.

Further strict rules prohibiting other students from teasing  and dis associating those with Hiv are put in place all cease stigma in students living with HIV/AIDS
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
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« Reply #24 on: May 28, 2009, 12:27:52 pm »

I will like to share this my experience with you. When i was administering questionnaires to come up with my manuscript "The will to combact HIV/AIDS" I found out that there were three groups of people
- Those who know and are well sensitised on HIV/AIDS and it consequencies but still go without the use of condoms.
- Those who are not well sensitised about hiv/aids and are not willing to hear or respond to any thing about hiv/aids.
- Those who are not sensitised and are willing to learn about hiv/aids.
My main aim was to find out why students still fall victim of hiv/aids when they know about prevention and the consequencies of hiv/aids.
i will like suggest that when curriculum for hiv/aids is being designed, more attention should be focust on the psychological aspect and the change of perception and attitute.
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« Reply #25 on: May 28, 2009, 02:07:51 pm »

Received via email:

The issues on culture should focus  and emphasized on cultral practices that encourages prevention such as Virgin marraiges etc.
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« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2009, 10:48:10 am »

Final contribution from Swaziland

The role of teachers in promoting safety and child protection in the school environment



• What is the role for teachers in ensuring that schools are safe places, free from abuse, violence, exploitation, HIV transmission through accidents, HIV-related stigma and discrimination, and homophobia? In what ways can teachers use their power or status to help or hinder HIV prevention?

The SCCS programme is helping to train teachers to offer protection to children trough the school support team of each school.

• How are teachers trained to create a safe environment for HIV education that fosters respect, trust, confidentiality, gender equality, openness and comfort in discussing sensitive issues? Are separate interventions required for girls and boys?
Two teachers are members of the school support team and they have a role of also sensitizing the other teachers.

• How can harmful practices including gender-based violence and abuse, sexual interactions between teachers and learners, and harassment be prevented? Are codes of conduct in place to prevent and to address reported cases of abuse? Consider also the role of ministries of education, head teachers, teachers’ commissions, teachers’ unions and parent-teacher associations in this area.
There are codes of conduct of teachers association (SNAT). The “Teaching Service Act” and “School Rules and Regulation” which offers guidelines and principles to ensure that gender-based violence and sexual interactions between teachers and learners are prevented. A teacher who behaves unprofessionally is brought before the TSC for discipline after evidence has been gathered through investigation. If a teacher is found guilty they get some kind of discipline which may be expulsion from the Teaching Profession. The TSC works closely with the schools manager in the Ministry of Education and Training (MoET).

A toll free line has been established in the MoET for children and concerned adults for report cases of abuse occurring in the school. After such reports, an investigation by officers in the guidance and counseling department launch an investigation into the case reported. The concerned child gets counseling if there’s a need.

These investigations are also coupled with sensitization of both Teachers and Learners in that particular school – concerning gender based violence occurring in schools and this can be prevented.
 
• What preparation and support are teachers being provided to deal with HIV-positive children or children affected by AIDS? What role are teachers playing in identifying vulnerable children and supporting linkages between schools and health and other social services?
The guidance teacher and the teachers who are members of the school support team (SST) in school as centre of care and support (SCCS) schools and head teachers have been trained on these issues. They report cases beyond their control to the school health nurses.

UNICEF together with the BMD department helps to register children who have no birth certificates. Baylor clinic has provided more specific training to some of the teachers (SST) members and guidance teachers.

• To what extent are teachers providing counseling and psychosocial support for HIV-affected children? Has any training been provided to support them in this role? Is this sustainable or do other mechanisms need to be put in place?

Some training has been provided to the guidance teachers on basic counseling and general psychosocial support for both primary and high school. At secondary school there is a more structured way of providing both guidance and counseling. However this is not sustainable because teachers get burnout as they are not remunerated for this, so there’s a need for full time school counselor.
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