UNESCO HIV and AIDS Education Clearinghouse forum UNESCO HIV and AIDS Education Clearinghouse forum
E-forum on Treatment, Care and Support for HIV and AIDS in Higher Education Institutions. This forum is held at the request of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Team on Education Working Group on Higher Education (WGHE). It aims to share experiences and good practices on the management of HIV and AIDS within higher education institutions, particularly universities as centres of treatment, care and support.

The forum will be open from 4 to 15 October 2010.

Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Supportive and enabling environments: Questions for discussion  (Read 111963 times)
nantuaids
teachers


Posts: 1


« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2009, 10:12:58 am »

The Namibia National Teachers’ Union (NANTU) collectively with the division of HIV and AIDS Management Unit (HAMU) in the Ministry of Education and other stakeholders have been engaged in efforts with the aim of creating a supportive and enabling environment for teachers affected by HIV and AIDS. NANTU has observed a situation where teachers affected by the disease are experiencing stigmatisation in various forms.

The situation prompted intervention from NANTU and led the union in partnership with the Ministry of Education and UNESCSO to establish a network for teachers living positive with HIV and AIDS. The network serve as a platform for teachers who are affected and infected to come together, share personal experience and encourage positive living.

At current the network is a home to 60 registered members, an elected technical committee consisting of NANTU, HAMU, UNESCO, AED and other stakeholders. Additional to that the network has created and filled a vacancy of Project Coordinator. The candidate has been attached to the HIV and AIDS Management Unit under the Ministry of Education.

Due to a communal and favourable relationship established by NANTU with the Ministry of Education, we were part of the team that took part in the drafting of the HIV and AIDS Workplace Wellness Policy for the Education Sector. The process has seen two NANTU National trainers serving on the editorial board of the policy.
NANTU has now been tasked to educate teachers on their rights and responsibilities subsequent to the implementation strategy of the HIV and AIDS Workplace Wellness Policy for the Education Sector.

Our Union has taken further steps to incorporate the policy within the NANTU EFAIDS programmes and teachers are currently receiving training on the Policy via publications and workshops.

Article that was published in the local newspaper

TEACHERS IN CAPRIVI CELEBRATE EDU-SECTOR HEALTH DAY

Educators in the Caprivi Region turned up in numbers to commemorate the Edu-Sector Health day held at the Caprivi college of Education on Friday 20th February 2009 under the theme ‘Healthy Workforce for better Service Delivery, Healthy Teachers For Quality Education’.

The day, which is aimed at exposing and providing education sectors employees and their families with HIV/AIDS prevention, voluntary testing and counseling communication saw countless employees turn up for HIV/AIDS testing.

Officiating at the event, the Minister of Health and Social Services, Richard Nchabi Kamwi said, since the education sector is the single largest employer with over 40 000 people it has an immense responsibility to ensure the preservation of its human capital.

He further noted that the current national prevalence rate 17.8 percent and Caprivi Region with 31.7 percent requires more concentrated efforts in addressing HIV/AIDS.

“There is a need to put measures in place that specifically addresses HIV prevention, care and support and impact currently mitigation programmes within the workplace to address socio-economic impacts currently being felt through reduces service delivery escalated by absenteeism and funeral attendance” he said.

Meanwhile, the Namibia National Teachers Union (NANTU)’s Secretary General who was also part of the event alleged a study conducted by the Ministry of Education in September 2007 revealed that sick leave is the commonly taken leave amongst employees in the education sector.

Haingura articulated that the absence of one teacher from his / her class has an effect on learners daily programs as they remain unattended to and fail to acquire the necessary skills and knowledge due to teachers absenteeism.

Services provided to hundreds of teachers and their families at the event were; HIV/AIDS Voluntary Counseling and testing, testing for blood sugar levels, testing blood pressure and Health education and promotion on Malaria, TB and Cholera. Meanwhile those that   tested HIV positive were encouraged to do the CD4s tests with the aim of enrolling them in the HAART programme at a later stage.

The Chief of Party of the USAID funded NEPP project, Muhammed Liman said, the surest way to de-mystify the fear and stigma associated with HIV and AIDS pandemic is through going for testing. “Once each one of us knows his or her status, the solution to the problem is around the corner”.

Liman further states those that test positive can receive treatment and live healthy lives as well as practice safer sex to continue being productive members of society.

The event was organised by the Ministry of Education through its HIV and AIDS Management Unit (HAMU), collectively with its partners the Namibia National Teachers Union (NANTU) and the Academy for Educational Developmet, (AED). Last year, Edu-Sector health day was held for Erongo, Khomas, Oshana, Ohangwena, Oshikoto and Omusati. The remaining regions are expected to hold similar events this year.

Prepared by:

Michael Nasheya
EFAIDS Coordinator
NANTU



Logged
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2009, 10:56:00 am »

In my country, i think policies are well in place but this policies are made for those that are in the field before contracting HIV/AIDS. For example before you are recruited if your medical certificate shows that you are HIV positive you will not be recruited.
As for the testing, it is free of charge and it is done in a highly confidential manner. a teacher cannot be sacked because he/she have been tested positive, he has the right for paid sick leaf, and enjoy equal right as any other employee and this is highly respected.
Logged
R_Chediel
teachers


Posts: 2


« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2009, 12:50:54 pm »

Teachers are not treated differently from other employees except when it comes to their code of conduct. The national policy on HIV and AIDS in Tanzania as well as the national strategic plan do not have specific statement on teachers. This was done purposely to avoid discrimination or stigmatization of the teachers. However, some of the teachers including their leaders would like to see at least a statement that address teachers. All in all, teachers need support so that they can perform their roles as teachers even if they are HIV and AIDS infected and affected. Such support can start with information and make sure that the requirements of the teachers are placed near the schools so as to avoid absenteeism. In a vast countries like Tanzania, some teachers may not know where to access HIV testing and ARVs including care and support providers. In Tanzania some findings show that infected teachers do not want to be transfered to their home villages for fear of being known that they are HIV and AIDS infected. In this case such teachers would not accept long leave although regualations allows this.     
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2009, 10:22:08 am »

A contribution from Central African Republic

To create an enabling environment and support for teachers affected by HIV / AIDS in the Central African Republic Our experience with the importance of this theme is to consider the teachers assigned to our company and deal with humanism. To do this, we have put in place a structure which has been developing in partnership with NGOs that have the same objectives as ours to increase awareness sessions in schools, universities and the institutes. In doing so, we created an atmosphere and we even managed to incorporate as many of these passions in our NGOs, learn them to be borne by the NGO agencies that have agreed to work with us . Finally we also have a program to provide training sessions in the interior of the country most affected by September 2009 and we are in the process of seeking funding for this project's success
Logged
Francelino da Silva Correia
teachers


Posts: 12


« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2009, 10:30:51 am »


My experiences in my Country many people sould be support and anabling enviroments for teacher affected to HIV/AIDS
and every teacher have high interest in this issues, but and not yet till to 100% to modified in response to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. why?

because
- Lack of the equipment for individual to teach the HIV /AIDS
- lack of the material of  teaching and information
- lack of the transportation
- lack of the financial supports
- lack of the theorytical towards intruduction to HIV/AIDS
- lack of the library of the HIV/AIDS
-lach of the specialist Experts to entrance in HIVand AIDS
lack of the Computerization to enrtering the date of  internet for HIV /AIDS
Logged

Fdscl
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2009, 05:15:58 pm »

UNESCO and UNAIDS should take a leading role in all that concerns HIV/AIDS. I think this bodies should not judge only on what the states presents but also on the local realities and what is happening in on the ground. some governments and states worst of all NGO'S turn to faulsify reports as far as HIV/AIDS is concern and therefore misleading the right path.
What do you think can be done to solve this problem?
Logged
Mark_Omolade
teachers


Posts: 14


« Reply #21 on: May 26, 2009, 08:20:37 am »

I will like to suggest to UNESCO and UNAIDS to make a policy that wil allow all Teachers and in-coming Teachers to go for HIV/AIDS test,and also send representatives to field to monitor the results.l want to believe that with this method,correct data of people living with the epidemic will be ascertained.
Logged
Tiferanji Vizyalona
teachers


Posts: 1


« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2009, 08:29:58 am »

Good Morning from Malawi,
Yesterday the forum was discussing the above topic, and there were two questions that were raised and I would like to respond on the first one.
Who is best suited to teach HIV education in schools: trained health care professionals or teachers and head teachers? I strongly feel that educators(teachers & Headteachers) themselves have to bear this responsibility. We are talking about the issue of mainstreaming here and if the education sector is to respond effectively we have to mainstream HIV&AIDS in the sector. It ought to be taken as an integral part of the sector. For the past decade in Malawi the issue of HIV & AIDS has been considered as a health issue and health professionals took a leading role and what did we achieve? Very little. I feel that the more we mainstream, with educators taking a leading role the more educators are going to personalise and identify themselves with the issue at hand. This will instill commitment in the sector. In Malawi the Ministry of Education has come up with an HIV & AIDS response stratigic plan from 20009-2012. The plan is arguing that "
To date prevention methodologies have been widely disseminated in a generic manner. The focus of these methodologies has been primarily on information, Education and communication; a clear testimony that not only is education important to the prevention of HIV but the prevention of HIV is itself essential education. Within the education sector, HIV affects the supply, demand, and quality of education, thereby limiting the capacity of the education sector to achieve Education for All (EFA) as well as achieve its Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)". Therefore, let us allow educators to be on the forefront and this will help us educators to change our negative behaviour and adopt positive ones if we are to ensure that our pupils are protected and provided with an environment that is safe for them.
Thanks,
Tiferanji Vizyalona,
Malawi.
Logged
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2009, 06:08:30 pm »

Concerning the topic for tomorrow, i strongly aggree that UNESCO and UNAIDS take a leadership role in the area of teachers and HIV and AIDS. Why so we have to be straifgt faward and face realities when we talk of HIV/AIDS issues because it is a real problem in our society. Corruption i will say especially in the developing countries is hindering the progress and efforts being made by some good will individuals and organisations. If things are left loose then we shall find our selves coming back to the same issues every day because of corrupt practices. i will like to suggest that if UNESCO and UNAIDS leave things loose as have been happening to be frank then we are leading to no where.
I will like to ask other participants if corruption also affect the progress being made in the domain of HIV/AIDS in your countries?
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2009, 10:14:14 am »

Central African Republic,

we believe that after so many awareness and training on land, teachers who are aware of their disease and who agreed to be taken care of, they are without exception are required to be on the ground they already accept their disease and are recommended to go return their training in various locations targeted in advance by officials of the land.
 
On that issue, and as I said, we are an NGO working on our first humanitarian objective. That said, we are mostly volunteers as we help our fellow citizens who are affected by this scourge. And we are not paid, but motivated to start work on the ground for lack of funding we have in that account drop. For those who deliver training to be effective, we must give them an incentive for them to education more equitable and practical on the ground freshly arrived we met with many difficulties, starting with the patients themselves who self. Those  not adhere too quickly our ideals. Therefore, to engage in areas such as ours, we must have the sense to be cold and calm the spirit of peace etc... to achieve the objectives.
 
We must be able to take control of our destiny that is our life. So, people affected by this scourge should consider accepting their illness like any other disease and should accept to be supported in order to build their future, and to strengthen these capacities, I wish that for the training sessions and awareness same everywhere in the workplace should be preferred as we do here in Central African Republic, this will answer the most effective strategy to combat this scourge.

DAMEGO-COTONFRANC  Jean Pierre Delmas
the Central African Republic
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2009, 10:17:20 am »

Message received via e-mail

Hello There,
 
I would to take time and contribute to the forum regarding the questions posed for tomorrow in terms of the role on UN teams and indeed developing partners.
 
Malawi is one of the countries participating in the IIEP sponsored research project on teacher management in the context of HIV and AIDS. The results show that there is very little that the government of Malawi is doing in this area. There is a 2% allocation in the budget for HIV and AIDS activities at all levels but its implemented is adhoc with no proper guidelines.

Most of the good work (and there has been a lot) has been done by developing partners and NGOs. In particular, Action Aid pioneered the implementation of Tiwoloke stepping stones project through the use of stepping stones methodology - an innovative and empowering tool. Tiwoloke was an HIV/AIDS behaviour change project in which ActionAid International Malawi in collaboration with the Ministry of Education worked to halt new HIV/AIDS among primary school teachers in Malawi and provide care and support to those already infected and affected.

This initiative culminated into the formation of T’LIPO (Teachers Living Positively); an association for teachers which has transformed the HIV and AIDS landscape. During the interviews in one of the districts, one of the key informants had this to say;

“Honestly TLIPO has assisted greatly in reducing deaths of teachers related to HIV and AIDS  .Two years ago, we used to have four funerals of teachers per month. But ever since these teachers came in the open and started encouraging others to live positively, deaths have dramatically reduced. Besides other work place interventions TLIPO has transformed teachers’ behaviour in terms of opening up and living positively.


Regards,
 
 
Joseph

Dr. Joseph P.G. Chimombo Centre for Educational Research and Training University of Malawi
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #26 on: May 27, 2009, 10:42:10 am »

For more information on the ActionAid Tiwoloke project a report is available online at:

http://hivaidsclearinghouse.unesco.org/search/format_long.php?lang=en&ret=index_expert.php&fiche=4509
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #27 on: May 28, 2009, 09:59:55 am »

•  Have management tools been adapted in order to monitor teacher absences, replacements, transfers and training? 

Hello,
 
Just a little contribution on the above question.
 
First from my experience of research work for many years, one of the greatest problems to policy implementation in developing countries in the absence of accurate and timely data. While schools struggle to keep enrolment figures, they hardly keep records of attendance for both pupils and teachers accurate. Registers for pupils and timesheets or attendance records for teachers are usually incomplete.

In the IIEP teacher management in the context of HIV and AIDS study, there was an attempt to assess the impact of the pandemic on teachers’ absenteeism. Interviewees had difficulties in attributing with certainty teachers’ absenteeism to HIV and AIDS problem. The study further examined mechanisms for teacher replacement. Ideally, chronic teacher shortage means that there are no teachers to replace with. The problem of teacher shortage is grave in Malawi. In fact communities will sometimes act and replace/complement teacher shortages with volunteer teachers. These are locally found people with some secondary level education. The interesting thing is that while government had originally not recognized these volunteer teachers, there is a change in policy to the extent that the new National Education Sector Plan has put in place mechanisms for upgrading these teachers through distance mode of training.
 
Regards,
 
 
Joseph


Dr. Joseph P.G. Chimombo Centre for Educational Research and Training University of Malawi
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #28 on: May 28, 2009, 10:01:55 am »

Response from Central African Republic to the summary of 27 May

The measures that are implemented in the Central African Republic are access which is a bit difficult at the School Health Center and University to enable teachers to have easy access to HIV testing, thanks to our NGO and Partnership with the NGO Center for iec Sexual Health of Young, we install on the premises of health centers that we have laboratories with qualified teams to decentralize and allow easy access to HIV testing in the capital and in the interior. After HIV testing, teachers whose results are positive, are automatically covered by our NGO in partnership with the bottom mondial.Et we found that it is the best effective in combating this scourge.


There are regulations in the Central African Republic to the needs of HIV-positive teachers, but the rules are applied as an NGO, we have regretted it from the government of our country to change méthodes.Finalement these rules are now applied, c That is to say give them the opportunity to treat them and supporting them with assistance and responding to their needs by supporting the Ministry of Social Affairs in the Ministry of Education in partnership by the UN AIDS and many other body in place in Central African Republic.
As regards the refusal to go on sick leave, if otherwise is not often there. Because teachers who are affected do not tell us but we know in our vigilance, fear that their students or their students know that they are affected, they are only teachers who do not accept assumed that it is, as regards teachers Relief yes, there are teachers who are recruited through competitive examination twice a year and trained for rescue in this area at the initiative of the European Union to address problems related to the replacement of teachers.

DAMEGO-COTOFRANC Jean Pierre Delmas
of Central African Republic
Logged
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #29 on: May 28, 2009, 12:39:18 pm »

Concerning the issue of corruption and the role it play in the hindering of the progress of hiv/aids.
I will like to make this clear that corruption had brought a big fall back and will still bring if adequate measures are not taken. People design projects for hiv/aids, bribe officials, go to the field and don't execute the projects and no body follows up. reports are frauded and sent.
If you are not a member in the system, your project will never be granted its a pety what is supposed to be done are not being done. This has caused some communities to grow hatret and don't even want to see people passing in their areas for hiv/aids issues.
I will like to suggest that a new page be open when it comes to funding hiv/aids project and a strict follow up.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC

Funding to support this forum has been provided by the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education
and the UNESCO International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP)
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS! Dilber MC Theme by HarzeM