UNESCO HIV and AIDS Education Clearinghouse forum UNESCO HIV and AIDS Education Clearinghouse forum
E-forum on Treatment, Care and Support for HIV and AIDS in Higher Education Institutions. This forum is held at the request of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Team on Education Working Group on Higher Education (WGHE). It aims to share experiences and good practices on the management of HIV and AIDS within higher education institutions, particularly universities as centres of treatment, care and support.

The forum will be open from 4 to 15 October 2010.

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Author Topic: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion  (Read 72715 times)
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« on: May 06, 2009, 01:59:11 pm »

• What mechanisms are in place in your country or the country/ies in which you work to support teachers to address HIV and AIDS? Consider, for example, the relative importance of: curriculum and associated instructional aids, support from teachers’ unions, school management and administration, links with parents and communities, quality assurance and support systems, and the establishment of a safe and secure institutional environment.
 
• Is there an education sector policy in your country or the country/ies in which you work and how does it address issues such as teacher training, professional conduct, supervision, and the workplace? Were professional bodies representing teachers involved in its development and review? How are the outcomes monitored?

• In your opinion, how does the process by which teachers are selected to teach about HIV affect their motivation to take on this task? In what way(s) do you think the teacher selection process impacts on the outcomes of their work? What recommendations might you make to improve the process?

• What are the incentives and the disincentives for teachers in becoming involved in HIV education? Is compensation, financial or otherwise, provided and is this seen to be fair?

• What additional managerial capacity needs to be built, or what existing capacity needs to be strengthened, to respond to HIV effectively?
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Barbara
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Posts: 5


« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2009, 12:07:14 pm »

Dear forum participants,

It is my pleasure to open this forum. I hope you will be able to log on easily and to share your contributions with us.

One point on which I would be interested in obtaining your views is that of extra incentives for teachers teaching on HIV prevention. At a recent workshop in Ghana on Educational planning and management, we learnt from participants that some teachers in both Ghana and Nigeria are asking for extra remuneration to teach on HIV although it is part of their in-service training. Is this happening in your countries as well? Why do you think this happening in Ghana and Nigeria?

Barbara
IIEP-UNESCO
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G_Dart
teachers


Posts: 3


« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2009, 04:08:44 pm »

I suppose we would have to know what the expectations are for the teachers - is it an 'extra' duty outside and beyond their normal teaching load? If so then perhaps they are viewing it as a post of responsibility which should be rewarded.
Or are they thinking that the cultural 'cost' of integrating the topic into their everyday teaching to them is quite high (in the sense that they are being asked to confront and talk about issues - sexuality / relationships / medical care etc - that has not been the remit of teachers traditionally and takes some courage to talk about)?
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Gareth Dart
Liesl Harewood
teachers


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« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2009, 04:39:33 pm »

 I am speaking for the experience in Barbados.

·         What mechanisms are in place in your country or the country/ies in which you work to support teachers to address HIV and AIDS? Consider, for example, the relative importance of: curriculum and associated instructional aids, support from teachers’ unions, school management and administration, links with parents and communities, quality assurance and support systems, and the establishment of a safe and secure institutional environment.

In many cases,HIV and AIDS-related themes have been included in the curriculum, especially in the arts, with suppoprt from school management.

 

·         Is there an education sector policy in your country or the country/ies in which you work and how does it address issues such as teacher training, professional conduct, supervision, and the workplace? Were professional bodies representing teachers involved in its development and review? How are the outcomes monitored?

·         In your opinion, how does the process by which teachers are selected to teach about HIV affect their motivation to take on this task? In what way(s) do you think the teacher selection process impacts on the outcomes of their work? What recommendations might you make to improve the process?

In my experience, teachers have been asked to volunteer.  Those who volunteer would probably have been intrinsically motivated but usually, this is seen as an addition to an already heavy workload.

 

·         What are the incentives and the disincentives for teachers in becoming involved in HIV education? Is compensation, financial or otherwise, provided and is this seen to be fair?

As far as I know, there is no compensation provided.  This could be one of the disincentives.  I also think that although teachers care about their students' welfare and may make general comments or address HIV in certain parts of the syllabus, they (we) feel that government can deploy people who are specifically trained in this area (health care professionals) to spearhead HIV education in schools.
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2009, 10:36:10 am »


I will like to participate in this topic because it is a very striking issue in My country. Much is being done in Cameroon for the sensitization of the public but in the domain of schools especially in the primary education, there is not enough being done. The curriculum provides no place for HIV/Aids education. HIV/AIDS is just a topic in the Health and environmental education. For this reason, very little importance is accorded to the formation of teachers to give effective training to the children. Presently also no text book or manual exist in the primary schools for HIV/AIDS.
School administrators and parents and the communities especially in the rural areas has no clear link at all since the truth is that they are less aware of the Issue of HIV/AIDS.
It was not until April 2009 when a training workshop for teachers was organised in Yaounde but this was not involving a visual number of teachers in the rural areas.
This i think will not really help the HIV/AIDS problem in our schools because few will be privileged than others.
I think the selection process to train teachers should be carried out selecting teachers from both the urban and rural areas and the training should take place in the local areas.
If Special teachers were recruited and trained specially for HIV/AIDS education and well motivated,  like how mathematics and English teachers are recruited, it will be of  great help.
What is needed to be done is to make HIV/AIDS as a subject to schools, text books and manuals for HIV/AIDS like the aids free generation book and others be introduced.
But foe this to happen, i think the Governments has to be supported financially and technically.
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Mark_Omolade
teachers


Posts: 14


« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2009, 10:43:37 am »

In Nigeria,l did a study on HIV/AIDS in a school among classroom teachers and effort to educate their pupils on prevention and the result revealed that there were more males that wanted the prevention to be compulsory in their school curriculum than females. With this type of a case,I'll suggest the school should make prevention of HIV/AIDS to be a compulsory subject in the curriculum. Mark
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M_Juma
teachers


Posts: 2


« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2009, 12:54:28 pm »

There is a need of empowering teachers to be able to enhance with students on HIV prevention. Up to this day there is not clear training to teachers on HIV prevention skills.

The policy should be implemented effectively.

Mgesi
+255 717 538853
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TSHEKO, G.N. (DR.)
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« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2009, 01:22:10 pm »

In Botswana, the teaching of HIV and AIDS has been integrated into some of the subjects taught in primary and secondary schools such as science, moral education and Guidance and counseling. HIV and AIDS is also supposed to be infused into other subjects. This however teachers find the most difficult to do. Currently the Ministry of Education and Skills Development is working through its Curriculum Development department to train teachers on using material that is meant for acquirement of lifeskills including HIV and AIDS topics. This in a way should assist teachers to gain confidence in teaching about HIV prevention in all subjects.
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Okonkwo Chijioke Obinna
teachers


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« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2009, 01:44:26 pm »

I Okonkwo Chijioke Obinna (Nigeria), from my own knowledge about this issue in Nigeria, the National Youth Service Corp(NYSC) scheme has posed a great challange to training of teachers on this subject matter. This is why government will always see teaching especially as work done by paupers. Teaching is a proffession likewise politics. One cannot seat in a country where politicians throw about money and you expect him to do free work;more work more pay or people to handle the project specifically be trained.  Teachers in Nigeria are poorly motivated exept for those of them in the Private schools. For many years now, public schools in Nigeria are moribund ,that is why you can see more females than males in most Public schools reason is because males feel that what they earn cannot pay their bills. This should be made curricurum based and not be used as an extra work for teachers who has being suffering for years now.
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« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2009, 02:56:20 pm »

Below is the translation of contribution orginally received in French from Oulaye Lydet from Côte d'Ivoire.

Given the difficulties medicine is facing in finding a cure for AIDS, prevention has become important. Emphasis is therefore placed on behavior change, as STDs are linked to an individual’s behavior. In the cases of pupils, the Education Ministry evokes sexual precocity, multiple sexual partners and the lack of condom use. The Ministry supposes that it is a question of information. In order to avoid STDs/AIDs and pregnancy amongst pupils, it has consequently decided, through the school curriculum, to inform them. Particularly at secondary level, which my research relates to, Civic and Moral Education is the subject through which, since 1983, the Ministry has initiated information in the area of sexuality. It was therefore via Civic and Moral Education that HIV and AIDS curricular were integrated from the mid 1990’s.

However, such efforts cannot hide the fact that the information which pupils may receive at school does not necessarily have an impact on the interactions and interrelations that pupils have with the social environment. Yet they also live their sexuality through these relations. To take the example of the family, in certain families there is a lack of communication between parents and their children on questions related to sexuality, it is not certain that parents relay the information their children receive in school.

In addition, since the beginning of the 1990’s society and school have been disrupted by social, economic and political problems, including the armed conflict in 2002. School is perturbed permanently by union demonstrations by the Fédération Estudiantine et Scolaire de Cote d’Ivoire, and more irregularly but perturbing nonetheless, by different teachers unions protesting about their living and working conditions. These difficulties which the school institution in general, and secondary education in particular, live through, are further obstacles to the vulgarization and transmission of information on STDs and HIV/AIDs in the school environment.

Therefore if school can contribute to information on STDs and HIV/AIDS, it must be emphasized that the results of these efforts also depend on the cultural, social, economic, political or institutional context within which they are deployed. Therefore when one of the fundamental aspects of the promotion of information in school, teacher training, is experiencing difficulties, the objectives of the transmission of knowledge are called into question.

Questions regarding the training of teachers in Civic and Moral Education and other related issues (the objectives of the school programme, the pedagogical methods used, didactical tools, results obtained, evaluation of results, regulation) have always constituted an enormous problem. The training of teachers in Civic and Moral Education is incomplete. Teaching is undertaken by secondary level teachers who initially were trained in other subjects (English, French, Earth and Life Sciences). Very few of them benefit from the irregular “training seminars” or “reconversion” organized by the Civic and Moral Education section of the Department of Education and Production of Learning Materials (Direction de la Pédagogie et de la Production des Matériels Didactiques). Civic and Moral Education is the “poor relation” of the direction, it lacks resources to undertake properly its activities, including the “training seminars” which support initial training. Teachers are therefore left to their own devices for pedagogical and didactical questions. They “manage” as best they can. If, in these circumstances, the objective of the transmission of knowledge to pupils, is more or less attained, the essential question remains as to whether behavior change with a view to reducing the number of pregnancies and STDs/AIDs in the school environment is occurring. No evaluation of this kind has been undertaken and it is not possible to provide a satisfactory response to this preoccupation.
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2009, 06:23:27 pm »


I will like to participate in this topic because it is a very striking issue in My country. Much is being done in Cameroon for the sensitization of the public but in the domain of schools especially in the primary education, there is not enough being done. The curriculum provides no place for HIV/Aids education. HIV/AIDS is just a topic in the Health and environmental education. For this reason, very little importance is accorded to the formation of teachers to give effective training to the children. Presently also no text book or manual exist in the primary schools for HIV/AIDS.
School administrators and parents and the communities especially in the rural areas has no clear link at all since the truth is that they are less aware of the Issue of HIV/AIDS.
It was not until April 2009 when a training workshop for teachers was organised in Yaounde but this was not involving a visual number of teachers in the rural areas.
This i think will not really help the HIV/AIDS problem in our schools because few will be privileged than others.
I think the selection process to train teachers should be carried out selecting teachers from both the urban and rural areas and the training should take place in the local areas.
If Special teachers were recruited and trained specially for HIV/AIDS education and well motivated,  like how mathematics and English teachers are recruited, it will be of  great help.
What is needed to be done is to make HIV/AIDS as a subject to schools, text books and manuals for HIV/AIDS like the aids free generation book and others be introduced.
But foe this to happen, i think the Governments has to be supported financially and technically.
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Moses_OrweOnyango
teachers


Posts: 9


« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2009, 06:25:05 pm »

In Kenya, there is an education sector policy. The policy is very clear on what all learning institutions should do. For example, all TTC are supposed to use the policy to come up with their own institutional HIV/AIDS policy. Not all colleges have these policies in place and that means they have not conceptualized HIV/AIDS. This leaves them at the mercy of NGO's who conducts ad hoc training on various aspects of HIV/AIDS education. This lack of systematic implementation of the education sector policy means tutors as well as trainee teachers are not well prepared to handle HIV/AIDS in their classes. The monitoring and evaluation department at the ministry needs to follow up on how the policy is being implemented. There are only 19 government TTC's. This follow up will wake up principals and deans of curriculum who have all been trained on HIV/AIDS! Since 2000 when the policy was launched, what are these people waiting for while new preventable HIV infections takes place because of ignorance.
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Inalegwu Frank Uji
teachers


Posts: 2


« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2009, 07:13:33 pm »

I am happy to be part of this discussion as am from one of the communities in Benue state Nigeria with high number of persons living with HIV/AIDS.

In Nigeria there are set of educational program for teachers in HIV/AIDS education.

The Federal ministry of health and UNESCO in 2002 organised a training and call for draft for HIV/AIDS curriculum in Nigeria and Inon schenker came from the UNESCO office i was part of the 1st draft. This is because of the spread of HIV/AIDS then and the Government felt there is need to call for Family Life Education in all the secondary schools and primary.

This call was to help the teachers build their skills as they are the ones closer to the students and develop them in learning about reproductive health and HIV.

Since then, they has been documents developed on Family life Education for secondary schools and most of the ministry of education have HIV/AIDS Units especially in Benue state, Nigeria.

Here, it is teacherss to students and parents as we have Parent Teachers Associations and teachers can help in spreading the HIV/AIDS education.

This days when we make HIV/AIDS as a health problem and money making, we will fail but if we can have the basic skills in HIV/AIDS education we can do better in helping to contribute to the prevention program.

We all have been affected directly and indirectly but if we fail to note its our responsibilities to help others, then we cant find the better cure.

The Country HIV/AIDS work policy is there but we see teachers discriminating against others living with HIV/AIDS. We should pay teachers to teach HIV/AIDS education? well thats okay but lets see how well teachers themselves taking time to even find out what is HIV/AIDS talk less of teaching but just want to be paid.

So every teacher would want to teach HIV/AIDS education. But should go and have a certificate in HIV/AIDS education and prevention even thos that have been trained because there were givien stippends durring the training, come back and wait for them to be paid and not care of stepping forward for others (not stepping down). It will be better for the teachers liviving with HIV/AIDS teach than those that are not showing their status.

As we all know, HIV/AIDS is not what we see it this days but where we all have to be to make us contribute to the prevention.
Do we the teachers care in carrying out HIV/AIDS research in our communities,schools or wait for others to come to our communities and do for us.
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Inalegwu Frank Uji
Project Coordinator,
Society for Life and Human Development Initiative
Nigeria.
+2348038636378
oikende@yahoo.com
https://sites.google.com/site/slhdinig/home
O_Olukoya
teachers


Posts: 1


« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2009, 01:20:02 am »

I really appreciate the organizers of this timely forum and the contribution of others. In Nigeria, Teachers and HIV prevention is an issue that needed sincere attention by the concerned authorities. For instance in Lagos Nigeria, the secondary schools have been divided into six districts and the schools  are all under the Lagos State Ministry of Education but the motivation and participation of primary and secondary school teachers in the prevention of HIV in Lagos and Nigeria have been very low before now. Kudos to the NGOs and the state ministries of health who have been collaborating with the state ministries of Education and NGOs in Nigerian schools to bring the message to the grassroots.

Having said that, it is what you have you can give. You can not give what you don’t have. Most of the teachers in our part of world don’t have basic knowledge of HIV education. Some don’t even want to talk about it at all, talkless of discussing the issue.

For instance in 2004 in Lagos, The issue of HIV prevention became necessary in primary schools in Lagos, the commercial capital of Nigeria, the most populous black nation around the world with population of over 140 million people, because of the alarming rate in the spread of the infection and because of this, the Nigeria Union of Teachers, Lagos State Wing, organized an awareness programme on the prevention of HIV among primary school pupils in Lagos, Nigeria.

The Nigeria Union of Teachers, Lagos State Wing, is charged with the responsibility of carrying out an IMPACT project on the prevention of HIV. Forty three advocacies were made and followed by the training of forty teachers as HIV coordinators in the forty primary schools in Ojo Local Government Education Authority. Four hundred pupils were also trained by these HIV coordinators as Peer Educators. They, in turn, were able to reach out to their peers through the Anti-AIDS club activities where they educate them on HIV prevention messages.

 The programme enabled participants’ free discussion on the issue of HIV and other health related issue among the peers. From their conversation, they tend to enlighten one another and now care for a healthy future which at the end of the day led to behavoiur change.

There have not been such programmes again since 2004. The authorities concerned are not doing enough. There are awareness programmes on daily bases from NGOs I just want to implore the concerned education managers to wake up.


Sesan Olukoya,
African Youth Empowerment-Nigeria.
Lagos
ayen_nigeria@yahoo.com
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Regina Lialabi Handongwe
teachers


Posts: 4


« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2009, 01:59:10 pm »

In Zambia there are so many programmes being implemented in schools focusing on HIV teachers and HIV prevention. There is need for all stakeholders and the government to conduct evidence based research on the impact that these programmes have especially on behaviour and attitude.

Regina
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