UNESCO HIV and AIDS Education Clearinghouse forum UNESCO HIV and AIDS Education Clearinghouse forum
E-forum on Treatment, Care and Support for HIV and AIDS in Higher Education Institutions. This forum is held at the request of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Team on Education Working Group on Higher Education (WGHE). It aims to share experiences and good practices on the management of HIV and AIDS within higher education institutions, particularly universities as centres of treatment, care and support.

The forum will be open from 4 to 15 October 2010.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5
  Print  
Author Topic: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion  (Read 72716 times)
Francelino da Silva Correia
teachers


Posts: 12


« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2009, 09:47:21 am »

the additional managerial leadership  must Excelent, skills of theory must be good, Organizational Classroom, capacity of Organized the laboratories is good, must graduated in biology or medical area including also graduated from the Agricultural Laboratories area..

In my opinions:
The incentives and the desicentives important for teacher to involved in HIV/AIDS education are :
1.Transportation Fee (Plan, sea, and land transportation)
2. Accomodation aid Support
3. Perdue for teacher who spend their time to involved in HIV and AIDS training.
4. salaries
5. Recreation fees
6. other compensation, Financial or otherwise.
Why I say that, because many teacher living at the villages and some times no transportation to quickly to do something at their jobs to prevent the HIV and AIDS but they meet the many difucuty problems. at transportation area this experiences in my Country. thank you. 
Logged

Fdscl
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #31 on: May 25, 2009, 02:35:30 pm »

Thanks Silva,
That was a very good suggestion. I can see that our countries are almost operating in the same manner. I will also want to suggest that these recommendations UNESCO should send them to our governments.
But what do you think about recruiting and training Psychologist and send to schools rather than the teachers and head teachers?   
Logged
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #32 on: May 25, 2009, 02:45:17 pm »

Different cultures and tradition especially in Africa and Cameroon in particular view HIV/AIDS in different ways, so in designing a curriculum for HIV/AIDS, we have to take into consideration the culture and tradition.
What do you think about this?
Logged
Moses_OrweOnyango
teachers


Posts: 9


« Reply #33 on: May 25, 2009, 09:49:02 pm »

As a biology teacher in secondary school in Kenya I taught HIV education as it was part of STIs sub-topic. The content was mainly biomedical hence I feel others should teach the other aspects as well. The head teacher can teach the policy aspects that deals with stigma and discrimination and thus provide leadership by making the school a safe place inclusive. The healthcare workers can help with care and support for those infected and affected as they need medication and assistance. Since the HIV/AIDS issue is more complex, the school cannot have all the expertise required hence there is even need to include other stakeholders who can provide referral services like guidance and counselling and part-time and vocational skills for those who need to support family members.
On the issue of traditions, norms and culture, I feel the Kenya curriculum developers are trying to please everyone hence they have always circumvented these issue by coming up with programmes that avoid mentioning sexuality. Previously we were at it with ABC where the C was suppose to mean better communication and not condom as is the case. Right now a new life skills programme has been launched in primary schools with a belief that if one is taught life skills s/he will be able to survive. Being assertive and a good communicator is good but I feel they are not enough. Lifeskills has not been proven to work in isolation, it is not 'the magic bullet'. We are going through a denial phase whereby the curriculum developers are playing diplomacy while giving half cake as far as HIV/AIDS education is concerned. This kind of scenario is what fuels new HIV infection.
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #34 on: May 26, 2009, 10:26:49 am »

A contribution received via email from Dr. T. Adepoju in Nigeria:

On Teaching HIV Education in Schools
 
Because of the nature of the epidemic, health care experts and professionals are best suited to teach HIV educations in schools but due to insufficient numbers of health care professionals in most of the developing countries, teachers and headteachers could be given series of trainings to be able to handle the teaching of HIV education in schools. Of course, teachers and headteachers will be very relevant in schools because schools is their workplace. When teachers and headteachers receive the needed trainings, they will be sufficiently equiped. For instance, a course/ workshop on educational planning and management in a World with AIDS organised by IIEP- BREDA between 20-24 April, 2009 in Accra, Ghana where I was a participant have university teachers and trainers from six African countries and the training received equipped us to teach HIV and AIDS related subjects in our institutions of learning. This is to say in essence that, teachers and headteachers can be trained to handle the teaching of HIV education in schools.
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #35 on: May 26, 2009, 10:28:46 am »

A contribution received via email from Dr. T. Adepoju in Nigeria:

On Curricullum Design 
 
For HIV and AIDS to be appropriately incorporated into the curriculum, there is no doubt that the culture and traditional norms should be taken into consideration. In Nigeria, the practice is that every culture and tradition of the people are considered in the process of designing HIV and AIDS curriculum.HIV and AIDs related subjects are teaching in local languages while the HIV and AIDS National Policy Technical Working Committee was made up of representatives of local, state and federal government agencies.
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2009, 12:38:46 pm »

A contribution received via email from Jean Pierre Delmas in the Central African Republic:

The mechanisms in place to assist teachers in the fight against HIV / AIDS in Central African Republic: the established processes of training for reproductive health, education etc ... whose teachers assigned adhered to these ideals, that they can experience the same atmosphere of people not affected by AIDS, to teach their students how to protect themselves to eradicate this scourge .For this, they are in the same company .
 
Central African Republic, we have implemented a policy to enable us to better work in this sector.
- As we are an NGO, trainers and volunteers as a lead Sociologist first biographical approach to target and locate areas of training and after training and awareness to take place, they will pass on the survey for improve the work.
Logged
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2009, 12:55:19 pm »

I see with you on your point of view for teachers and head teachers to be trained for HIV/AIDS education in schools because it is their work place. The type of workshop organised by IIEP- BREDA between 20-24 April, 2009 in Accra, Ghana should be encouraged in all countries and be done in a systematic way. Yes i think your idea was a good one.
Logged
Moses_OrweOnyango
teachers


Posts: 9


« Reply #38 on: May 27, 2009, 12:17:53 am »

I totally support the idea of UNESCO and UNAIDS assisting with teacher training and helping schools in developing institional policies. This is in line with the Kenya Education Sector HIV/AIDS policy that requires each learning institution to develop their own policy using the education sector policy as a framework. The policy also encourages learning institutions to seek partnership with stakeholders dealing with HIV/AIDS issues: hence enganging with UNESCO & UNAIDS will be welcomed. So far most institutions lack the capacity to fund training for teachers and most have not even seen the education sector policy since it was launched in 2004. I personaly benefited from a training offered by Inwent and the The University of Western Cape, South Africa, the course was fully sponsored for teacher educators and since then I have facilitated many in-service programmes apart from designing and integrating HIV preventive education in our Institute for Educational Development, Eastern Africa. I feel most teachers need a proper training, teaching materials/resources and support from the school administration to deliver the 'education vaccine' to the learners. By having an institutional policy developed by the school's stakeholders, there will be a condusive atmosphere where silence towards HIV/AIDS can be broken.
Logged
Francelino da Silva Correia
teachers


Posts: 12


« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2009, 02:43:44 am »

Answer Quetion discusion yesterday

Accordings my Idea or Exeriences during involved in schools, as Teacher in Biology, so the best of Suited to teach about HIV and AIDS is Teacher and health care only Only
Logged

Fdscl
Francelino da Silva Correia
teachers


Posts: 12


« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2009, 03:00:21 am »

Answer Questions yesterday:

The role of jointly between UNAIDS Team on HIV /AIDS and supporting teachers at the countri level are.

My idea.
The first is How to support the Financial otherwise for teachers training.
The second is to support Especially  Expert from the HIV AIDS Departmen or major. to teach the teacher who involved teir self in the HIV Teacher Training.
The third is Jointly at establesh the Curriculum of Clasrrom teaching.


Regards

Francelino da Silva Correia
Logged

Fdscl
Homayoon Shirzad
teachers


Posts: 1


« Reply #41 on: May 27, 2009, 04:11:34 am »

Dear beloved friends,

I am writing you from Afghanistan.  A place where it is so prone to HIV diseases and risks due to highly illigal migrations and lack of awareness.

In Afghanistan the ministry of Public Health with the support of the international communities implemented various HIV Aids awareness programs and it has given very good result and I can share my expereince with you as bellow.

1. As in Afghanistan, the Mullahs/Imams are the most respected and trusted bodies of each village/mosque from relegios point of view so the organization I work with trained these Mullahas so that during their Fridays talks in the mosque and also by village visit preaches the subjects of HIV Aids and related diseases to communities. How we did was we trained the Mullahs as ToT for 20 days then they were sent to the villages to train 10 other Mullas and then those 10 other Mullas will act in their mosques. This way we were 100 successful as in Islamic countries people listen to Mullas a lot.

However, it is also very good idea to train school teachers to take led in informing all studenst and other communities in regard to HIV Aids.

I don't think it is good to pay teachers for what they talk about HIV Aids as in the long run it can be another disaster to afford it. Teachers could part of their duty teach this subject.

This was my brief expereince.
Thanks,
Homayoon Shirzad
from Afghanistan
Logged
PP_Gile
teachers


Posts: 2


« Reply #42 on: May 27, 2009, 07:15:39 am »

Yes, UNAIDS and UNESCO could play pivotal role on standardization of curriculum, building /enhancing the capacity of educational institutions, HIV/AIDS focal points as well as relevant teachers, participate in policy revisions and redesigning strategies, if appropriate, organize consultative and best practice sharing fora, facilitate knowledge transfer adn knowledge management society,and skill transfer opportunities.

Logged

Philipos Petros Gile
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #43 on: May 27, 2009, 10:22:01 am »

A contribution received via email from Mulindwa Augustine in Uganda:

To the question of who should teach  about the HIV/AIDS in the schools, i suggest that it should be the teachers just because they are being listened to with much care than others.Students tend to take their teachers more seriously.
Headteachers should play arole too in teaching just because of the authoritative nature of their job at schools .That will make their teaching very cardinal.
 
In Uganda however,the Ministry of Education and sports,is initiating the teaching of sex education in schools. It is done through NCDC(National Curriculum Development Center).After pilotting of it then it will be implemented by the teachers.
 
Now the parents are objecting the idea already just because it is contradicting with cultural norms .In Buganda forinstance where i come from,the work is done by helders.Here the teaching of the girls is done by the aunts and the boys by the their auncles and at later stage when the brains are well developed to recieve such information.
 
But there is also the issue of the media where students learn good and bad from tvs, radios and the newspapers not to mention the internet for those in city centers.So the idea of preserving good norms like those that protect virginity and prevent fornication in  an african setting is challenged by the influence of the media .
 
So i strongly urge teachers to do teach about HIV/AIDS because it has claimed lives of anumber of their students,fellow teachers, and relatives despite the strong cultural norms and values being pursued and mantained.It shows that there are some loopholes in the practice and that is what our societies call ''WESTERNISATION'' the young pupils and students they want to copy what they watch in movies especially issues to do with love.
 
I say so because now there is nothing much to hide from students of this generation as they learn alot from their suroundigs like in the ghettos where some of our students are being raised.
And  here in Uganda a number of parents are too shy to talk about things relating to sex which is the major cause of AIDS.
 
Healthy workers would be very vital in doing the work of teaching but the man power is limitted and they are always bussy at their work places and their personal clinics and our government can not facilitate such aprogramme because of limitted funds that's why they
want to make it asubject.
 
In anutshell, how can one deal with the idea of teaching about sex in abid derive causes of it and it's impact with out indirectly telling students to practice it.

Good regards

mulindwa augustine
Logged
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
*****
Posts: 74


« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2009, 11:03:39 am »

A contribution received via email from Kisakye Julius in Uganda:

There is an education sector policy on HIV in Uganda. The education sector HIV/AIDS work place policy in Uganda is silent about teacher training and HIV. However the Ministry has integrated HIV education, information and communication within the entire education system and levels as appropriately as the level may require.

Regarding the professional conduct, the policy is very clear in a section 6.0-6.2 “The responsibility of the employer, employees and learners” professional ethics are emphasized.

According to the HIV work place policy of the Ministry of Education, supervision for the implementation is clearly indicated in the section 7.0-7.1 with the Ministry having the HIV/AIDS sector coordinator as the overall supervisor.

The policy is also clear as far as the workplace is concerned. The policy promotes non-discrimination for the HIV positive workers and learners at the workplace.

The policy provides for the availability of free medical care for the education sector employees, their families and the learners. The problem however is that HIV/AIDS has never been fully accepted as a normal disease by some members in our society, so stigma and discrimination has continued to exist in some sections of the workplace.

Professional bodies representing teachers were involved in the policy development but reviewers are yet to be undertaken.

UNATU: Uganda National Teachers Union and TAAG have been involved.

The outcomes of the policy are yet to be effectively monitored by the Ministry but  efforts are being made to set up a system of monitoring.

The policy booklets are being provided to all education institutions but they are still very few compared to the need.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC

Funding to support this forum has been provided by the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education
and the UNESCO International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP)
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS! Dilber MC Theme by HarzeM