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E-forum on Treatment, Care and Support for HIV and AIDS in Higher Education Institutions. This forum is held at the request of the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Team on Education Working Group on Higher Education (WGHE). It aims to share experiences and good practices on the management of HIV and AIDS within higher education institutions, particularly universities as centres of treatment, care and support.

The forum will be open from 4 to 15 October 2010.

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Author Topic: Teachers and HIV prevention: Questions for discussion  (Read 72717 times)
Mark_Omolade
teachers


Posts: 14


« Reply #45 on: May 27, 2009, 01:49:22 pm »

 Dear Moderator! Please,l'll suggest to UNESCO and UNAIDS to come up with a policy for governments in countries to integrate  teaching  of sex education and HIV/AIDS  as part  of subjects to their curriculum right from primary schools,by that method it will not look like a taboo or strange thing among some cultures in Africa. Teachers and Head Teachers are in the best position to teach HIV/AIDS.
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Inon Schenker
teachers


Posts: 1


« Reply #46 on: May 27, 2009, 04:41:30 pm »

Looking back at the first formal consultation on School AIDS Education organized in 1988 by then the only global AIDS Program (of WHO, headed by late Prof Jonathan Mann) - we must acknowledge the major achievements globally and in many nations in addressing the needs of teachers and learners in HIV prevention. Shortcomings are evident too, and if we look at the relatively small number of studies documenting scientifically success of teachers in preventing new HIV infections - we could be discouraged.
Let me share some insights from the Middle East; a multi cultural, neglected, problematic region with a low HIV prevalence and incidence:
1) Teachers were recognized as loyal partners in HIV prevention very late into the epidemic. Curricula development (vs. teachers' training) was considered a priority, yet it lacked the necessary skills-building approaches
2) Religion (Islam in most countries of the region, Judaism in Israel) is a barrier to date in introducing meaningful messages on prevention. Teachers in the more fundamental countries are under constant pressures not to include certain messages when talking about HIV/AIDS prevention. They are also not trained comprehensively to be able to better deliver in this area.
3) Like other regions, competing subjects drive HIV/AIDS to the bottom of the list. The very low HIV prevalence is not supporting a change in this policy or prioritization.
4) With Arabic being the most spoken language in MENA, lack of teaching and training materials in Arabic makes it difficult for teachers to have (even basic) tools. A great effort of UNESCO/Beirut helped mobilize MOE to be more participatory in this area but with limited follow up. I remember well when the first comprehensive curriculum (including manual, flipcharts, posters etc) on Preventive HIV/AIDS Education in Arabic was published in 1995 it was widely distributed in the region despite the fact that it originated in..... Israel. There were no other materials at that time. Things have changed by now. UNICEF complied information on HIV prevention projects in the region and the publication is available on line.
5) At the same time several regional initiatives on teachers and HIV prevention in MENA are best practice and hailed by the international community. One of them is "HIV as a Bridge for Peace" which brought together HIV educators to develop a regional network on HIV/AIDS education. More than 500 Egyptian, Jordanian, Turkish, Moroccan and (mostly) Palestinian and Israeli teachers and other AIDS Educators met in Jerusalem\Bethlehem in a series of workshops and developed a most impressive network. The participants in that project proved that fighting AIDS could do more than prevent new infections - it may be another road to reconciliation.

Dr Inon Schenker, PhD MPH
Senior HIV/AIDS Prevention Specialist
Global Health Consultant   
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Moses_OrweOnyango
teachers


Posts: 9


« Reply #47 on: May 27, 2009, 06:25:54 pm »

Corruption is everywhere in Kenya and the HIV/AIDS fund is not spared either. First it is in the office of the president where the fund is administred fro since HIV/AIDS was declared a national disaster, which gives the president powers to use all means possible to combat the disaster. The former chairlady was taken to court over claims of corruption regarding HIV/AIDS funds.
The experts are not spared either, the ministry of education runs the HIV/AIDS funds from their offices instead of the right departments within the ministry like Kenya Institute of Education (KIE) who are suppossed to normally develop a curriculum and train teachers and provide resources for the same. Instead KIE still develops the curriculum while the ministry officials organize ad hoc training for teachers. Reason, they can control the funds while paying themselves allowances for taking part in organising trainings. Right now life skills curriculum is already released by KIE to schools and nothing is happening about life skills in primary teacher training colleges in terms of training teachers who are supposed to teach the life skills in schools.
Pricipals and head teachers are corrupt too, they pend their names and their administion on nearly all training opportunities on HIV/AIDS just because they get paid allowances for attending such courses especially if it involves travelling too. Yet they and most of these head of departments and dean of curriculum do not actually teach in the classrooms of their respective colleges.
As for inspection and follow-up, I think forms just get filled in the offices and forwarded to the ministry without actually suprvising the actual teaching. Carry any small scale survey and you will be amased at how many institutions in Kenya do not teach about HIV/AIDS despite it having been integrated in the curriculum as per the education sector policy.
Should HIV/AIDS be taught as a standalone examinable subject for it to be taught and time and resources including personnel be allocated?
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Fadokun James Banji
teachers


Posts: 1


« Reply #48 on: May 28, 2009, 12:26:21 am »

Dear Moderator! Please,l'll suggest to UNESCO and UNAIDS to come up with a policy for governments in countries to integrate  teaching  of sex education and HIV/AIDS  as part  of subjects to their curriculum right from primary schools,by that method it will not look like a taboo or strange thing among some cultures in Africa. Teachers and Head Teachers are in the best position to teach HIV/AIDS.

UNESCO and other UN agencies such as UNICEF,UNFPA as well as bilateral agencies like DFID and USAID have been making effort in  encouraging government in Africa to integrate sexuality education into the curriculum of primary to teriary level.Nigeria has for instance integrated Family Life HIV/AIDS education into core subjects at primary to secondary levels.At the tertiary level,Family Life and Emerging Health Issues has also beeb integrated into the curriculum of Colleges of Education.Teachers and lecturers have also been trained on how to use the curriculum.The  problem however in the Nigerian context is mass producing the curriculum so that teachers will have access to them .The initial fifty thousand copies distributed could not go round.
I agree that UNESCO and UNAIDS IATT need to re-echo its strategies for HIV/AIDS preventive education,but governments and their education Ministries and agencies need to take ownership of this efforts inorder for it to make a huge impact and for it to be sustained
In Nigerian situation for Instance UNESCO provided technical support for the development of the National HIV/AIDS Policy for the Education Sector.The policy actually stresses the strategic importance of integrating Family Life and HIV/AIDS Education Curriculum into all levels of the education sector.So each country has to be on the driver seat to drive the process while  technical supportwill be provided from UNESCO and other development
partners
James Fadokun
Nigeria
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Francelino da Silva Correia
teachers


Posts: 12


« Reply #49 on: May 28, 2009, 03:14:40 am »


For every sections in my country now, The Ministry Of health have managemnt tools and good relations with other Organization International to implements this issues. and good results at recently.
but at Education level we have pregress the programme about the management tools to Monitor the teacher absences replacement transfer  and training skills.

In my country many organization Involved in HIV and AIDS to hindering the progress.
I sew they have good implement together Community society and also UN Agencies.
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Fdscl
Forum Moderator
Administrator
Jr. Member
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Posts: 74


« Reply #50 on: May 28, 2009, 09:58:38 am »

A response from Nigeria to the questions raised in the daily summary of 27 May

On Curruption and Progress
 
In Nigeria, hardly can we see any sector without elements of curruption. The parastatal of the government at the three levels of government is also characterised with corruption.The story of corruption hidering the progress and efforts of individuals and organisation involved in HIV and AIDS is also the case in Nigeria.
 
On Management Tools
 
In Nigeria, we have management tools which are being used to monitor teacher s' absenteesm, replacement, transfer and training.   
 
Dr. T. L. Adepoju
Obafemi Awolowo University
Nigeria
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #51 on: May 28, 2009, 05:41:50 pm »

Concerning the topic for tomorrow Should HIV and AIDS be taught as a standalone subject in schools so that it can receive the appropriate allocation of time, resources and personnel?
If people go to school is to learn how to improve on life. I think hiv/aids should be given equal importance like arithmetics, biology and goegraphy. HIV/AIDS is a real problem and needs special attention. It should be thought as a standalone subject.
In so doing, more and adequate messages will be passed on to the children.
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Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #52 on: May 28, 2009, 05:47:15 pm »

If we need to safe lives, make the world a better place and to divert some of the huge some of money being spent on hiv/aids, we need to start educate especially the children and in so doing, they have to be be passed quantity and quality knowledge and to acheive this, hiv/aids lessons have to be given more time and to have more time, it has to be thought as a subject.
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Managa
teachers


Posts: 4


« Reply #53 on: May 28, 2009, 08:59:30 pm »

Dear Colleagues,

My apologies for not being able to participate as I had intended to. I have been perusing the discussions and want to advise that as a part of the Higher Education HIV and AIDS Programme in South Africa, we have done some research exploring the Roles of educators in mitigating the impact of HIV - this looks at educators across three sectors - schools, the FET sector and higher education and then we piloted an HIV module at teacher education faculties - looking at pre-service and in-service.

The preliminary findings and results have been very interesting and I will be happy to share some thoughts with anyone that may be interested and therefore invite you to contact me.....
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Moses_OrweOnyango
teachers


Posts: 9


« Reply #54 on: May 28, 2009, 09:54:46 pm »

Interviewees in a research I conducted in Kenya on the status of the integrated HIV prevention education in learning institutions suggested that HIV/AIDS should be taught as a standalone examinble subject for it to be taught comphensively. A University in Kenya has introduced a compulsory HIV unit for all the students taking bachelor of education. The unit is graded and thus programmed, resourced and staffed. This is the way to go in our overcrowded examination driven curriculum where what is valued is tested and thus get taught!
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Francelino da Silva Correia
teachers


Posts: 12


« Reply #55 on: May 29, 2009, 02:46:15 am »

 management of Tools:
In Timop Leste we have the management tools to monitor the teacher absences during the abandonance their Duties or obligations, my be Mutation to other location, receive the sansation expulsion etc.

management hindaring and progress:
 Departement education and department of health together NGoS International have organized all activities and planning  to support the Hinder and corruptions in Timor Leste to related to the HIV and AIDS 

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Fdscl
Arrey Emmanuel Enow
teachers


Posts: 22


« Reply #56 on: May 29, 2009, 11:03:51 am »

Dear Managa,
Your research is very interesting. i will like to share the result of the findings.
best regards

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Francelino da Silva Correia
teachers


Posts: 12


« Reply #57 on: May 29, 2009, 11:34:29 am »

For my opinions :
How to increasing the capacity of selection of the teacher to teach the HIV/AIDS :
 The first steps are : Must good selection from the local area and origin people and also teacher from the urban or rural.

The management supports fro structure are :
Government, International NGO's, other agencies must support the Financial aid. it  will be involeved also Intergovernmental how to support the Financial. leaderships training how to organized the programme at fields.

Who will be involved or selected/Nominated in this program must be good skills attitude behavior, and also excelent in the theory degree.
my be together in this item to strengthened the capacity.all members in the trained to HIV/AIDS.
Thank you.
By
Francelino da Silva Correia

 
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Eileen Nkwanga
teachers


Posts: 4


« Reply #58 on: May 29, 2009, 03:06:18 pm »

I am raising questions on the sustainability and intensification of current efforts to address HIV/AIDS throughout the education sector.

1. How sustainable are the current activities in HIV and AIDS given the reliance on Overseas Development Assistance?  I note that Peter Piot stated some time back that current efforts would need to be sustained for decades if there were to be permanent benefits.  Can funding levels be sustained in view of the current financial crisis in USA and Europe?
2. Where are ODA funds going?  Are they being properly accounted for?
3.  How can the transparency of budgeting and accounting be improved especially where ODA funds are incorporated in national budgets?  How can it be ensured that
funds are released in a timely fashion?
4.  If the time comes that donors no longer drive the process of addressing HIV/AIDS are governments sufficiently committed to the process and to providing the necessary human, financial and material resources in future?  In countries with shaky economies where will the funds come from?
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Forum Moderator
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Jr. Member
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Posts: 74


« Reply #59 on: May 29, 2009, 03:57:20 pm »

Dear Colleagues,

My apologies for not being able to participate as I had intended to. I have been perusing the discussions and want to advise that as a part of the Higher Education HIV and AIDS Programme in South Africa, we have done some research exploring the Roles of educators in mitigating the impact of HIV - this looks at educators across three sectors - schools, the FET sector and higher education and then we piloted an HIV module at teacher education faculties - looking at pre-service and in-service.

The preliminary findings and results have been very interesting and I will be happy to share some thoughts with anyone that may be interested and therefore invite you to contact me.....

More information at www.heaids.org.za or to contact Managa - managa@hesa.org.za
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